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International Migration: A Global Complex Network

Author

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  • Emmanouil Tranos

    (VU University Amsterdam)

  • Masood Gheasi

    (VU University Amsterdam)

  • Peter Nijkamp

    (VU University Amsterdam)

Abstract

Migration has become a prominent research theme in geography and regional science and it has been approached from various methodological angles. Nonetheless, a common missing element in most migration studies is the lack of awareness of the overall network topology, which characterizes migration flows. Although gravity models focus on spatial interaction - in this case migration - between pairs of origins and destinations, they do not provide insights into the topology of a migration network. In the present paper, we will employ network analysis to address such systemic research questions, in particular: How centralized or dispersed are migration flows and how does this structure evolve over time? And how is migration activity clustered between specific countries, and if so, do such patterns change over time? Going a step further than exploratory network analysis, this paper estimates international migration models for OECD countries based on a dual ap proach: gravity models estimated using conventional econometric approaches such as panel data regressions as well as network-based regression techniques such as MRQAP. The empirical results reveal not only the determinants of international migration among OECD countries, but also the value of blending network analysis with more conventional analytic methods.

Suggested Citation

  • Emmanouil Tranos & Masood Gheasi & Peter Nijkamp, 2012. "International Migration: A Global Complex Network," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 12-123/VIII, Tinbergen Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:tin:wpaper:20120123
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    Cited by:

    1. Fagiolo, Giorgio & Santoni, Gianluca, 2015. "Human-mobility networks, country income, and labor productivity," Network Science, Cambridge University Press, vol. 3(03), pages 377-407, September.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    immigration; gravity model; complex networks; community detection; MRQAP;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • D85 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Network Formation

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