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The role of codified sources of knowledge in innovation: empirical evidence from Dutch manufacturing

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Abstract

This paper explores ongoing debates about the role that codified forms of knowledge play in fostering firms' and countries' innovative performance. It aims to provide an empirical exploration of the use of codified sources of information for innovation at the sectoral level. Despite considerable interest in David and Foray's (1995) work on the codification of knowledge and the changing nature of innovation due to the use of information and communication technologies, there are relatively few empirical studies that probe the role of codified sources of information in the innovation process. Our goal is to assess 'how' important codified sources of information are for innovation for different sectors and to the innovation system in general. We explore the relationship between the use of codified sources by individual firms and increases in the 'distributional power' of an innovation system, a key component in David and Foray's codification argument. We then link the use of codified sources to different innovative strategies and characteristics of innovation at the firm level. The data used for the analysis is based on The Netherlands Community Innovation Survey (II) for the manufacturing sector. The data set covers 1997 firms in 11 major industries.

Suggested Citation

  • Stefano Brusoni & Orietta Marsili & Ammon Salter, 2002. "The role of codified sources of knowledge in innovation: empirical evidence from Dutch manufacturing," SPRU Working Paper Series 80, SPRU - Science and Technology Policy Research, University of Sussex.
  • Handle: RePEc:sru:ssewps:80
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    Cited by:

    1. Albahari, Alberto & Pérez-Canto, Salvador & Barge-Gil, Andrés & Modrego, Aurelia, 2017. "Technology Parks versus Science Parks: Does the university make the difference?," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 116(C), pages 13-28.
    2. Vaccaro, Antonino & Veloso, Francisco & Brusoni, Stefano, 2009. "The impact of virtual technologies on knowledge-based processes: An empirical study," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(8), pages 1278-1287, October.
    3. Tom Broekel & Matthias Brachert, 2015. "The structure and evolution of inter-sectoral technological complementarity in R&D in Germany from 1990 to 2011," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 25(4), pages 755-785, September.
    4. Paul H. Jensen & Elizabeth Webster, 2006. "Managing Knowledge Flows through Appropriation and Learning Strategies," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2006n06, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    5. L. C. Hunter & Elizabeth Webster & Anne Wyatt, 2009. "Identifying Corporate Expenditures on Intangibles Using GAAP," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2009n12, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    6. Arora, Ashish & Athreye, Suma & Huang, Can, 2016. "The paradox of openness revisited: Collaborative innovation and patenting by UK innovators," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(7), pages 1352-1361.
    7. Thomä Jörg & Zimmermann Volker, 2013. "Knowledge Protection Practices in Innovating SMEs," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 233(5-6), pages 691-717, October.
    8. Ulrich Witt & Tom Broekel & Thomas Brenner, 2012. "Knowledge and its Economic Characteristics: A Conceptual Clarification," Chapters,in: Handbook of Knowledge and Economics, chapter 16 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    9. repec:eee:respol:v:46:y:2017:i:7:p:1327-1339 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. L. C. Hunter & Elizabeth Webster & Anne Wyatt, 2005. "Measuring Intangible Investment," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2005n15, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    11. Aykut Lenger & Erol Taymaz, 2006. "To innovate or to transfer?," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 16(1), pages 137-153, April.
    12. MOTHE Caroline & NGUYEN Thi Thuc Uyen, 2011. "Do firms rely on sources of information for organizational innovation?," LISER Working Paper Series 2011-39, LISER.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Innovation; knowledge; manufacturing industries; codification;

    JEL classification:

    • L60 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Manufacturing - - - General
    • O32 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Management of Technological Innovation and R&D
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes

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