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Externalities and Agricultural Import Bans: Evaluating Regionalization Measures in Light of the Russia – Pigs Dispute

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  • Emily Blanchard
  • Mark Wu

Abstract

Article 6 of the SPS Agreement presents a series of interlinked obligations for importing and exporting countries of diseased agricultural products. The Russia – Pigs dispute raises the question of when an importing country is justified in imposing a ban on products from exporting countries unaffected by the disease, on the basis of the fact that the country is part of the same customs union as another country inflicted with the disease. This Article contends that four distinct classes of cross-border and cross-product externalities ought to play in an important role when assessing this question in the future. It discusses the possible roles to be played by bilateral, sequential, pass-through, and supply chain externalities in propagating the transmission of agricultural disease across borders through trade.

Suggested Citation

  • Emily Blanchard & Mark Wu, 2018. "Externalities and Agricultural Import Bans: Evaluating Regionalization Measures in Light of the Russia – Pigs Dispute," RSCAS Working Papers 2018/60, European University Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:rsc:rsceui:2018/60
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Michael Margolis & Jason Shogren, 2012. "Disguised Protectionism, Global Trade Rules and Alien Invasive Species," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 51(1), pages 105-118, January.
    2. Kamal Saggi & Mark Wu, 2018. "Trade and Agricultural Disease: Import Restrictions in the Wake of the India–Agricultural Products Dispute," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: Economic Analysis of the Rules and Regulations of the World Trade Organization, chapter 21, pages 483-506 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
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    Keywords

    Externalities; Dispute Settlement; SPS; African Swine Flu; Agricultural Disease;

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