IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/rru/oapubs/10197-2971.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

From asset based welfare to welfare housing? The changing function of social housing in Ireland

Author

Listed:
  • Michelle Norris
  • Tony Fahey

Abstract

This article examines a distinctive and significant aspect of social housing in Ireland – its change in function from an asset-based role in welfare support to a more standard model of welfare housing. It outlines the nationalist and agrarian drivers which expanded the initial role of social housing beyond the goal of improving housing conditions for the poor towards the goal of extending home ownership and assesses whether this focus made it more similar to the ‘asset based welfare’ approach to housing found in south-east Asia than to social housing in western Europe. From the mid-1980s, the role of Irish social housing changed as the sector contracted and evolved towards the model of welfare housing now found in many other western countries. Policy makers have struggled to address the implications of this transition and vestiges of social housing’s traditional function are still evident, consequently the boundaries between social housing, private renting and home ownership in Ireland have grown increasingly nebulous.

Suggested Citation

  • Michelle Norris & Tony Fahey, 2011. "From asset based welfare to welfare housing? The changing function of social housing in Ireland," Open Access publications 10197/2971, Research Repository, University College Dublin.
  • Handle: RePEc:rru:oapubs:10197/2971
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10197/2971
    File Function: Open Access version, 2011
    Download Restriction: no

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Michelle Norris & Michael Byrne, 2017. "Housing Market Volatility,Stability and Social Rented Housing: comparing Austria and Ireland during the global financial crisis," Working Papers 201705, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
    2. Dorothy Watson & Eoin Corrigan, 2019. "Social Housing in the Irish Housing Market," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 50(1), pages 213-248.
    3. Michelle Norris, 2018. "Financing the Golden Age of Irish Social Housing, 1932-1956 (and the dark ages which followed)," Working Papers 201901, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
    4. Michelle Norris & Nessa Winston, 2012. "Young People's Trajectories through Irish Housing Booms and Busts: headship, housing and labour market access among the under 30s since the late 1960s," Open Access publications 10197/4922, Research Repository, University College Dublin.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:rru:oapubs:10197/2971. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Joseph Greene). General contact details of provider: http://researchrepository.ucd.ie .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.