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Labor Reallocation: Panel Evidence from U.S. States

Author

Listed:
  • Dimitrios Bakas

    () (Department of Economics, University of Athens, Greece; Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis (RCEA), Italy)

  • Theodore Panagiotidis

    () (Department of Economics, University of Macedonia, Greece; Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis (RCEA), Italy)

  • Gianluigi Pelloni

    () (Department of Economics, University of Bologna, Johns Hopkins University Bologna Center, and Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis (RCEA), Italy; Department of Economics, Wilfrid Laurier University, Canada)

Abstract

This paper re-examines Lilien’s sectoral shifts hypothesis for U.S. unemployment. We employ a monthly panel that spans from 1990:01 to 2011:12 for 48 U.S. states. Panel unit root tests that allow for cross-sectional dependence reveal the stationarity of unemployment. Within a framework that takes into account dynamics, parameter heterogeneity and cross-sectional dependence in the panel, we show that sectoral reallocation is significant not only at the aggregate level but also at the state level. The magnitude and the statistical significance of the latter as measured by Lilien’s index increases when both heterogeneity and cross-sectional dependence are taken into account.

Suggested Citation

  • Dimitrios Bakas & Theodore Panagiotidis & Gianluigi Pelloni, 2013. "Labor Reallocation: Panel Evidence from U.S. States," Working Paper series 26_13, Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis.
  • Handle: RePEc:rim:rimwps:26_13
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    Cited by:

    1. Bakas, Dimitrios & Panagiotidis, Theodore & Pelloni, Gianluigi, 2016. "On the significance of labour reallocation for European unemployment: Evidence from a panel of 15 countries," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 39(PB), pages 229-240.
    2. Giovanni Gallipoli & Gianluigi Pelloni, 2013. "Macroeconomic Effects of Job Reallocations: A Survey," Review of Economic Analysis, Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis, vol. 5(2), pages 127-176, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Unemployment; Sectoral Shifts; Employment Fluctuations; Dynamic Panel Data; Parameter Heterogeneity; Cross-Sectional Dependence;

    JEL classification:

    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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