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History of Economics or a Selected History of Economics?

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  • Palma, Nuno

Abstract

While research on the history of economics can be important to modern economics, the work of historians of economics is more often than reasonable associated with either non-contemporary or heterodox issues. I provide quantitative evidence of this, by analyzing the publications in the three main history of economics journals over the last fourteen years (1993-2006). This trend must change if the work of historians of economics is to be taken seriously by mainstream economists.

Suggested Citation

  • Palma, Nuno, 2007. "History of Economics or a Selected History of Economics?," MPRA Paper 5111, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:5111
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kenneth E. Boulding, 1971. "After Samuelson, Who Needs Adam Smith?," History of Political Economy, Duke University Press, vol. 3(2), pages 225-237, Fall.
    2. Weintraub, E. Roy, 2007. "Economic Science Wars," Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Cambridge University Press, vol. 29(03), pages 267-282, September.
    3. Moscati, Ivan, 2008. "More Economics, Please: We'Re Historians Of Economics," Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Cambridge University Press, vol. 30(01), pages 85-92, March.
    4. Esther-Mirjam Sent, 1999. "The randomness of rational expectations: a perspective on Sargent's early incentives," The European Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(3), pages 439-471.
    5. Mark Blaug, 2001. "No History of Ideas, Please, We're Economists," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 15(1), pages 145-164, Winter.
    6. Olivier Blanchard, 2000. "What Do We Know about Macroeconomics that Fisher and Wicksell Did Not?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 115(4), pages 1375-1409.
    7. Kenneth Arrow, 2001. "The five most significant developments in economics of the twentieth century," The European Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(3), pages 298-304.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    History of Economics;

    JEL classification:

    • B4 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Economic Methodology
    • B0 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - General

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