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History of Economics or a Selected History of Economics?

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  • Palma, Nuno

Abstract

While research on the history of economics can be important to modern economics, the work of historians of economics is more often than reasonable associated with either non-contemporary or heterodox issues. I provide quantitative evidence of this, by analyzing the publications in the three main history of economics journals over the last fourteen years (1993-2006). This trend must change if the work of historians of economics is to be taken seriously by mainstream economists.

Suggested Citation

  • Palma, Nuno, 2007. "History of Economics or a Selected History of Economics?," MPRA Paper 5111, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:5111
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    7. Axel Leijonhufvud, 2006. "The uses of the past," Department of Economics Working Papers 0603, Department of Economics, University of Trento, Italia.
    8. Olivier Blanchard, 2000. "What Do We Know about Macroeconomics that Fisher and Wicksell Did Not?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 115(4), pages 1375-1409.
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    Cited by:

    1. A. Maltsev., 2015. "History of Economic Thought, Quo vadis?," VOPROSY ECONOMIKI, N.P. Redaktsiya zhurnala "Voprosy Economiki", vol. 3.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    History of Economics;

    JEL classification:

    • B4 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Economic Methodology
    • B0 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - General

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