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Institutional matrices and institutional changes



This article represents a paper for the 5th International Symposium on Evolutionary Economics “Economic Transformation and Evolutionary Theory of J. Schumpeter” (Pushchino, Moscow region, Russia, 25-27 September, 2003). There is shown, that the comparison of two well-known works of Josef Schumpeter (“The Theory of Economic Development” and “Capitalism, Socialism, and Democracy”) displays a discrepancy between the two visions of development of market economic systems – evolutionary and transformational, i.e. non-evolutionary transition into a qualitatively different state. No theoretical schema that would reconcile logically these two visions was left to us by Schumpeter. Is it possible to deal with this discrepancy in a correct way? What in economy changes evolutionarily and what is transformed? What structures persist and where is the room for institutional changes? An attempt to find the answer within the framework of the theory of institutional matrices is presented.

Suggested Citation

  • Kirdina, Svetlana, 2003. "Institutional matrices and institutional changes," MPRA Paper 29691, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:29691

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Anna E. Jurczuk & Piotr Pysz, 2016. "Dokąd zmierzał system gospodarczy Polski w latach 1995–2012?," Gospodarka Narodowa, Warsaw School of Economics, issue 3, pages 5-34.
    2. Malgorzata Zielenkiewicz, 2014. "Institutional Environment In The Context Of Development Of Sustainable Society In The European Union Countries," Equilibrium. Quarterly Journal of Economics and Economic Policy, Institute of Economic Research, vol. 9(1), pages 21-37, March.

    More about this item


    institutional matrices theory Schumpeter institutional changes;

    JEL classification:

    • B40 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Economic Methodology - - - General
    • B52 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Current Heterodox Approaches - - - Historical; Institutional; Evolutionary
    • B15 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought through 1925 - - - Historical; Institutional; Evolutionary


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