IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Preparing for Basel IV : why liquidity risks still present a challenge to regulators in prudential supervision (II)


  • Ojo, Marianne


Whilst the predecessor (Part I) to this paper addresses criticisms and challenges which have arisen in response to recent Basel Committee's initiatives aimed at addressing capital and liquidity standards, the present paper highlights further measures which are being introduced by the Basel Committee to address such criticisms and challenges. As well as presenting and drawing attention to proposals which could serve as means of addressing challenges presented by liquidity risks, Part I of the paper concludes with the result that market based regulation is an essential and vital tool in the Basel Committee's efforts to address some of the challenges presented by liquidity risks. The present paper highlights the Basel Committee's acknowledgement of this conclusion. Furthermore, it draws attention to other areas which are considered to constitute fertile substrates for purposes of future research. This paper will also illustrate why the potential of banking regulations and disclosure requirements to impact risk taking levels is not only dependent on certain factors such as the dissemination of information to appropriate recipients, appropriate volume of disseminated information, when to disseminate such information, but also on other factors such as ownership structures and effective corporate governance measures aimed fostering monitoring, supervision and accountability.

Suggested Citation

  • Ojo, Marianne, 2010. "Preparing for Basel IV : why liquidity risks still present a challenge to regulators in prudential supervision (II)," MPRA Paper 27778, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:27778

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    File Function: original version
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Shenggen Fan, 2000. "Research Investment and the Economic Returns To Chinese Agricultural Research," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 14(2), pages 163-182, September.
    2. Mullen, John D., 2007. "Productivity Growth and the Returns from Public Investment in R&D in Australian Broadacre Agriculture," 2007 Conference (51st), February 13-16, 2007, Queenstown, New Zealand 9451, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    3. Dickey, David A & Fuller, Wayne A, 1981. "Likelihood Ratio Statistics for Autoregressive Time Series with a Unit Root," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(4), pages 1057-1072, June.
    4. Shujat Ali, 2005. "Total Factor Productivity Growth and Agricultural Research and Extension: An Analysis of Pakistan's Agriculture, 1960-1996," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 44(4), pages 729-746.
    5. Johansen, Soren & Juselius, Katarina, 1990. "Maximum Likelihood Estimation and Inference on Cointegration--With Applications to the Demand for Money," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 52(2), pages 169-210, May.
    6. Julia Hall & Grant M Scobie, 2006. "The Role of R&D in Productivity Growth: The Case of Agriculture in New Zealand: 1927 to 2001," Treasury Working Paper Series 06/01, New Zealand Treasury.
    7. Mullen, John D., 2007. "Productivity growth and the returns from public investment in R&D in Australian broadacre agriculture," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 51(4), December.
    8. Araji, A.A. & White, Fred C. & Guenthner, Joseph F., 1995. "Spillovers And The Returns To Agricultural Research For Potatoes," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 20(02), December.
    9. Hendry, David F. & Ericsson, Neil R., 1991. "Modeling the demand for narrow money in the United Kingdom and the United States," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 833-881, May.
    10. Granger, C. W. J. & Newbold, P., 1974. "Spurious regressions in econometrics," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 2(2), pages 111-120, July.
    11. Schimmelpfennig, David & Thirtle, Colin & van Zyl, Johan & Arnade, Carlos & Khatri, Yougesh, 2000. "Short and long-run returns to agricultural R&D in South Africa, or will the real rate of return please stand up?," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 23(1), pages 1-15, June.
    12. Engle, Robert & Granger, Clive, 2015. "Co-integration and error correction: Representation, estimation, and testing," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 39(3), pages 106-135.
    13. Makki, Shiva S. & Thraen, Cameron S. & Tweeten, Luther G., 1999. "Returns to American Agricultural Research: Results from a Cointegration Model," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 21(2), pages 185-211, March.
    14. Jorge Fernandez-Cornejo & C. Richard Shumway, 1997. "Research and Productivity in Mexican Agriculture," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 79(3), pages 738-753.
    15. Govereh, Jones & Shawa, Julius J. & Malawo, Emma & Jayne, Thomas S., 2006. "Raising the Productivity of Public Investments in Zambia’s Agricultural Sector," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 54479, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    16. Colin Thirtle & Lin Lin Lin & Jim Holding & Lindie Jenkins & Jenifer Piesse, 2004. "Explaining the Decline in UK Agricultural Productivity Growth," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(2), pages 343-366.
    17. Johansen, Soren, 1988. "Statistical analysis of cointegration vectors," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 12(2-3), pages 231-254.
    18. John Mullen, 2007. "Productivity growth and the returns from public investment in R&D in Australian broadacre agriculture," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 51(4), pages 359-384, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item


    liquidity risks; systemic risks; capital; standards; Basel III; moral hazard; disclosure; information; Liquidity Coverage Ratio (LCR); Net Stable Funding Ratio (NSFR); accountability; corporate governance;

    JEL classification:

    • K2 - Law and Economics - - Regulation and Business Law
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • G3 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance
    • D8 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty
    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:27778. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Joachim Winter). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.