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Iran: Past, Present and the Future


  • Zangeneh, Hamid


Iran's unimpressive economic performance came about as a result of the Iran-Iraq War and the inevitable collapse of oil prices, both of which were beyond the government’s control, in combination with economic sanctions and many self-inflicted and self-destructive policies. Foremost among the self-inflicted and self-destructive wounds is the insecurity of individual citizens, human rights violations; the faltering private investment, is lack of uniformity in the application of the laws of the land and uncertainty due to political instability, corruption, and low exports and imports (total trade) relative to the world total trade.

Suggested Citation

  • Zangeneh, Hamid, 2010. "Iran: Past, Present and the Future," MPRA Paper 26283, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:26283

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Lawrence H. White (ed.), 1993. "Free Banking," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, volume 0, number 615.
    2. Zangeneh, Hamid, 2007. "An Estimate of Iran’s Underground Economy: A Monetary Approach," MPRA Paper 26619, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2009.
    3. Zangeneh, Hamid, 2006. "Saving, Investment and Growth: A Causality Test," MPRA Paper 26806, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2006.
    4. Hamid Zangeneh, 2006. "Saving, Investment, and Growth: A Causality Test," Iranian Economic Review, Economics faculty of Tehran university, vol. 11(2), pages 165-175, spring.
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    More about this item


    Iran; economic growth; economy; inflation; international trade; investment;

    JEL classification:

    • F00 - International Economics - - General - - - General
    • O5 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies
    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade

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