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Natural resource wealth “a truly double edged sword?”: a comparative study between Iran and Norway

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  • Nasrollahi Shahri, Nima

Abstract

This is an analytical comparative study done from a historical perspective between Iran and Norway as classic examples of countries touched by resource abundance contrastingly. The study tries to highlight the factors which turn oil riches into a curse so as to serve as a brief practical set of guidelines for countries facing the possibility of a natural resource related revenue increase. This study, however, does not purport to cover all the factors in play, but is rather of an interdisciplinary nature demonstrating the significance of Politics in the fate of Oil-rich countries. An abridged account of the petroleum sector and some other relevant information about the two states is initially given. The study then focuses on historical, economic, management and political differences which could have been influential in the way the two countries have been affected by their riches. A number of key differences are listed and elaborated on in more detail with the aid of examples invoked from similar countries. The study finds that factors such as the political structure of a country as well as its population and timing of oil discoveries, as factors not completely controlled by the state, carry a lot of weight in determining how successful a country is likely to be in managing its resources.

Suggested Citation

  • Nasrollahi Shahri, Nima, 2010. "Natural resource wealth “a truly double edged sword?”: a comparative study between Iran and Norway," MPRA Paper 25639, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:25639
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/25639/1/MPRA_paper_25639.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Silje Aslaksen & Ragnar Torvik, 2006. "A Theory of Civil Conflict and Democracy in Rentier States," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 108(4), pages 571-585, December.
    2. Sachs, Jeffrey D. & Warner, Andrew M., 2001. "The curse of natural resources," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 45(4-6), pages 827-838, May.
    3. Gylfason, Thorvaldur, 2001. "Natural resources, education, and economic development," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 45(4-6), pages 847-859, May.
    4. Larsen, E.Roed., 2005. "Are rich countries immune to the resource curse? Evidence from Norway's management of its oil riches," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 75-86, June.
    5. Erling Røed Larsen, 2006. "Escaping the Resource Curse and the Dutch Disease?," American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 65(3), pages 605-640, July.
    6. Atsushi Iimi, 2007. "Escaping from the Resource Curse: Evidence from Botswana and the Rest of the World," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 54(4), pages 663-699, November.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Resource riches; resource curse; Norway; Iran;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • A12 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Relation of Economics to Other Disciplines
    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior
    • A10 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - General

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