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“The Right to the City” An Ecosystemic Approach to Better Cities, Better Life


  • Pilon, André Francisco / A. F.


Urbanism is a focus on cities and urban areas, their geography, economies, politics, social characteristics, as well as the effects on, and caused by, the built environment; it is linked to various aspects of quality of life: education, culture, justice, labour, environment, health, safety, housing, leisure, transport, consumption. This year, the United Nations proposed the following questions for the citizens of the world: What is the best thing about your city? What's the worst thing about your city? What do you want the authorities to do about it? What can you do about it? It is a clear attempt to foster civic participation and personal engagement, but to make things happen it is necessary to create active socio-cultural niches at many societal levels.

Suggested Citation

  • Pilon, André Francisco / A. F., 2010. "“The Right to the City” An Ecosystemic Approach to Better Cities, Better Life," MPRA Paper 25572, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:25572

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    Urbanism; politics; education; culture; justice;

    JEL classification:

    • D73 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Bureaucracy; Administrative Processes in Public Organizations; Corruption
    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • H11 - Public Economics - - Structure and Scope of Government - - - Structure and Scope of Government
    • Q48 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Government Policy
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • D02 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Institutions: Design, Formation, Operations, and Impact
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • O21 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - Planning Models; Planning Policy

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