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Effects And Determinants Of Mild Underweight Among Preschool Children Across Countries And Over Time

Author

Listed:
  • Priya Bhagowalia

    () (Dept of Economics, TERI University, New Delhi, India)

  • Susan E. Chen

    ()

  • William A. Masters

    () (Purdue University,Dept. of Agricultural Economics)

Abstract

Research on malnutrition typically focuses on severe cases, where anthropometric status falls below or above an extreme threshold. Such categorization is necessary for clinicians since mild cases may not justify intervention, but researchers could find that changes in mild malnutrition convey valuable information about mortality risk and health status. This paper focuses on changes in both mild and severe underweight in young children, as measured by 130 DHS surveys for 53 countries over a period from 1986 to 2007. We find that counting variance in all forms of underweight provides closer correlations with aggregate health outcomes (the underfive child mortality rate), and is more closely correlated to several influences of malnutrition (national income, gender equality and agricultural output). We conclude that the full distribution of nutritional status deserves greater attention, including in this case the prevalence of mild underweight among preschool children in developing countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Priya Bhagowalia & Susan E. Chen & William A. Masters, 2009. "Effects And Determinants Of Mild Underweight Among Preschool Children Across Countries And Over Time," Working Papers 09-13, Purdue University, College of Agriculture, Department of Agricultural Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:pae:wpaper:09-13
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/bitstream/54312/2/09-13.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Christian Paul & Dillon Brian, 2016. "Working Paper 241 - Long term consequences of consumption seasonality," Working Paper Series 2349, African Development Bank.
    2. Millimet, Daniel L. & Tchernis, Rusty, 2015. "Persistence in body mass index in a recent cohort of US children," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 17(C), pages 157-176.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Underweight; weight-for-height; wasting; child mortality; FGT measures; DHS data;

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • Q18 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Policy; Food Policy

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