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Nanotechnology for Green Innovation


  • OECD


The paper brings together information collected through discussions and projects undertaken by the OECD Working Party on Nanotechnology (WPN) relevant to the development and use of nanotechnology for green innovation. It relies in particular on preliminary results from the WPN project on the Responsible Development of Nanotechnology and on conclusions from a symposium, organised by the OECD WPN together with the United States National Nanotechnology Initiative, which took place in March 2012 in Washington DC, United States, on Assessing the Economic Impact of Nanotechnology. It also draws on material from the four background papers that were developed for the symposium.

Suggested Citation

  • Oecd, 2013. "Nanotechnology for Green Innovation," OECD Science, Technology and Industry Policy Papers 5, OECD Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:oec:stiaac:5-en

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    Cited by:

    1. Erling Barth & James C. Davis & Richard B. Freeman & Andrew J. Wang, 2017. "The Effects of Scientists and Engineers on Productivity and Earnings at the Establishment Where They Work," NBER Chapters,in: U.S. Engineering in a Global Economy National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Bilgili, Tsvetomira V. & Kedia, Ben L. & Bilgili, Hansin, 2016. "Exploring the influence of resource environments on absorptive capacity development: The case of emerging market firms," Journal of World Business, Elsevier, vol. 51(5), pages 700-712.
    3. Ufuk Akcigit & Murat Alp Celik & Jeremy Greenwood, 2016. "Buy, Keep, or Sell: Economic Growth and the Market for Ideas," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 84, pages 943-984, May.

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