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Finance and productivity: A literature review

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  • Mark Heil

    (U.S. Department of the Treasury)

Abstract

This paper surveys a broad range of studies and highlights the main findings of the empirical literature regarding business finance and productivity. Numerous studies analyse the productivity effects of financial development and frictions. The results suggest: 1) Financial development likely has favourable effects on productivity growth; 2) financial frictions that impede the efficient flow of finance can mitigate the positive effects through a variety of channels; and 3) the magnitudes of productivity costs of financial frictions generally appear modest in financially developed economies but are considerably larger in developing economies. The paper also reviews studies of the influence of specific mechanisms on productivity, such as human capital, corporate finance, financial sector efficiency, equity finance and venture capital. Some policies that hamper productivity growth include inefficient insolvency regimes that impede exit of low-productivity firms, poorly developed contract monitoring and enforcement systems between banks and firms, collateral constraints that impair resource reallocation and imperfect bank supervisory practices that diminish productive capital reallocation through distorted lending practices.

Suggested Citation

  • Mark Heil, 2017. "Finance and productivity: A literature review," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 1374, OECD Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:oec:ecoaaa:1374-en
    DOI: 10.1787/41194fea-en
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Hwang, Sunjoo, 2020. "Financial Development and Economic Growth in Korea," KDI Journal of Economic Policy, Korea Development Institute (KDI), vol. 42(1), pages 31-56.
    2. Alexandra Tsvetkova & Rudiger Ahrend & Joaquim Oliveira Martins & Alexander C. Lembcke & Polina Knutsson & Dylan Jong & Nikolaos Terzidis, 2020. "The spatial dimension of productivity: Connecting the dots across industries, firms and places," OECD Regional Development Working Papers 2020/01, OECD Publishing.
    3. Kyunam Kim, 2017. "Impact of Firms’ Cooperative Innovation Strategy on Technological Convergence Performance: The Case of Korea’s ICT Industry," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 9(9), pages 1-22, September.
    4. Aikman, David & Haldane, Andrew & Hinterschweiger, Marc & Kapadia, Sujit, 2018. "Rethinking financial stability," Bank of England working papers 712, Bank of England.
    5. Denila Jinny Arulraj & Thillai Rajan Annamalai, 2020. "Firms’ Financing Choices and Firm Productivity: Evidence from an Emerging Economy," International Journal of Global Business and Competitiveness, Springer, vol. 15(1), pages 35-48, June.
    6. Jeremy Kronick, 2018. "Productivity and the Financial Sector – What’s Missing?," C.D. Howe Institute Commentary, C.D. Howe Institute, issue 508, April.
    7. Doerr, Sebastian, 2018. "Collateral, Reallocation, and Aggregate Productivity: Evidence from the U.S. Housing Boom," MPRA Paper 106163, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Denila Jinny Arulraj & Thillai Rajan Annamalai, 0. "Firms’ Financing Choices and Firm Productivity: Evidence from an Emerging Economy," International Journal of Global Business and Competitiveness, Springer, vol. 0, pages 1-14.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    business cycle; finance; financial development; financial friction; human capital; insolvency regime; productivity; venture capital;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D2 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations
    • G2 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services
    • G3 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance
    • J2 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor
    • O4 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity

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