IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/nbr/nberwo/3229.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Aggregate Employment Dynamcis and Lumpy Adjustment Costs

Author

Listed:
  • Daniel S. Hamermesh

Abstract

This study examines what one can infer from aggregate time-series of employment under the assumption that adjustment at the micro level is discrete because of lumpy adjustment costs. The research uses various sets of quarterly and monthly data for the United States and imposes assumptions about how sectoral dispersion in output shocks affects adjustment through aggregation. I find no consistent evidence of any effect of sectoral shocks on the path of aggregate employment. I generate artificial aggregate time series from microeconomic processes in which firms adjust employment discretely. They produce the same inferences as the actual data. Standard methods of estimating equations describing the time path of aggregate employment yield inferences about differences in the size of adjustment costs that are incorrect and inconsistent with the true differences at the micro level. This simulation suggests that the large literature on employment dynamics based on industry or macro data cannot inform us about the size of adjustment costs, and that such data cannot yield useful information on variations in adjustment costs over time or among countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Daniel S. Hamermesh, 1990. "Aggregate Employment Dynamcis and Lumpy Adjustment Costs," NBER Working Papers 3229, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:3229
    Note: LS EFG
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w3229.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Mulligan Casey B, 2001. "Aggregate Implications of Indivisible Labor," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 1(1), pages 1-35, April.
    2. Robert G. King & Julia K. Thomas, 2006. "Partial Adjustment Without Apology," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 47(3), pages 779-809, August.
    3. Casey B. Mulligan, 1998. "Microfoundations and macro implications of indivisible labor," Discussion Paper / Institute for Empirical Macroeconomics 126, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
    4. Hamermesh, Daniel S, 1992. "A General Model of Dynamic Labor Demand," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 74(4), pages 733-737, November.
    5. Yann Nicolas & Claude Mathieu, 2006. "Coûts d'ajustement de la demande de travail : une comparaison entre la France et la République tchèque," Économie et Prévision, Programme National Persée, vol. 173(2), pages 135-152.
    6. Varejão, José & Portugal, Pedro, 2007. "Spatial and Temporal Aggregation in the Estimation of Labor Demand Functions," IZA Discussion Papers 2701, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Kölling, Arnd & Schnabel, Claus & Wagner, Joachim, 2001. "Bremst das Schwerbehindertengesetz die Arbeitsplatzdynamik in Kleinbetrieben?," Discussion Papers 4, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Chair of Labour and Regional Economics.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:3229. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/nberrus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.