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Do sporty people have access to higher job quality?



It is known that non-cognitive skills are an important determinant of success in life. However, their returns are not simple to measure and, as a result, only relatively few studies have dealt with this empirical question on the labour market. We consider sports practice as a way to improve or signal non-cognitive skills endowment. Therefore, the analysis of its impact on the labour market integration allows us to evaluate the returns of some specific non-cognitive skills. We test the hypothesis that sporty people -ceteris paribus- have access to higher quality of job thanks to the non-cognitive skills they have or they are supposed to have. Using objective measures of job quality, we demonstrate that being sporty does matter and that its effect cannot be award to any other extracurricular activities

Suggested Citation

  • Charlotte Cabane, 2010. "Do sporty people have access to higher job quality?," Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne 10029, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1), Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne.
  • Handle: RePEc:mse:cesdoc:10029

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Andersen, Torben G & Bollerslev, Tim, 1998. "Answering the Skeptics: Yes, Standard Volatility Models Do Provide Accurate Forecasts," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 39(4), pages 885-905, November.
    2. Banz, Rolf W., 1981. "The relationship between return and market value of common stocks," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 9(1), pages 3-18, March.
    3. Torben G. Andersen & Tim Bollerslev & Francis X. Diebold & Paul Labys, 2003. "Modeling and Forecasting Realized Volatility," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 71(2), pages 579-625, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Michael Lechner & Paul Downward, 2017. "Heterogeneous sports participation and labour market outcomes in England," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(4), pages 335-348, January.
    2. Sari, Nazmi & Lechner, Michael, 2015. "Long-run health effects of sports and exercise in Canada," Economics Working Paper Series 1520, University of St. Gallen, School of Economics and Political Science.

    More about this item


    Job quality; sport; non-cognitive skills;

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J28 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Safety; Job Satisfaction; Related Public Policy
    • L83 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Sports; Gambling; Restaurants; Recreation; Tourism
    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education


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