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Proximity and Coresidence of Adult Children and their Parents: Description and Correlates

Author

Listed:
  • Janice Compton

    (University of Manitoba)

  • Robert A. Pollak

    (Washington University in St. Louis)

Abstract

The ability of family members to engage in intergenerational transfers of hands-on care requires close proximity or coresidence. In this paper we describe and analyze the patterns of proximity and coresidence involving adult children and their mothers using data from the National Survey of Families and Households (NSFH) and the U.S. Census. Although intergenerational coresidence has been declining in the United States, most Americans live within 25 miles of their mothers. In both the raw data and in regression analyses, the most robust predictor of proximity of adult children to their mothers is education. Individuals are less likely to live near their mothers if they have a college degree. Virtually all previous studies have considered coresidence alone, or else treat coresidence as a limiting case of close proximity. We show that this treatment is misleading. We find substantial differences in the correlates of proximity by gender and marital status, indicating the need to model these categories separately. Other demographic variables such as age, race and ethnicity also affect the probability of coresidence and close proximity, but characteristics indicating a current need for transfers (e.g., disability) are not correlated with close proximity.

Suggested Citation

  • Janice Compton & Robert A. Pollak, 2009. "Proximity and Coresidence of Adult Children and their Parents: Description and Correlates," Working Papers wp215, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
  • Handle: RePEc:mrr:papers:wp215
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    File URL: http://www.mrrc.isr.umich.edu/publications/Papers/pdf/wp215.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. André de Palma & Nathalie Picard & Ignacio Inoa, 2014. "Discrete choice decision-making with multiple decision-makers within the household," Chapters,in: Handbook of Choice Modelling, chapter 16, pages 363-382 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Katrine Løken & Kjell Lommerud & Shelly Lundberg, 2013. "Your Place or Mine? On the Residence Choice of Young Couples in Norway," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 50(1), pages 285-310, February.
    3. Meliyanni Johar & Shiko Maruyama, 2012. "Externality and Strategic Interaction in the Location Choice of Siblings under Altruism toward Parents," Working Papers 201201, ARC Centre of Excellence in Population Ageing Research (CEPAR), Australian School of Business, University of New South Wales.
    4. Battistin, Erich & De Nadai, Michele & Padula, Mario, 2014. "Roadblocks on the Road to Grandma's House: Fertility Consequences of Delayed Retirement," CEPR Discussion Papers 9945, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    5. Robert A. Pollak, 2011. "Allocating Time: Individuals' Technologies, Household Technology, Perfect Substitutes, and Specialization," NBER Working Papers 17529, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Helena Holmlund & Helmut Rainer & Thomas Siedler, 2013. "Meet the Parents? Family Size and the Geographic Proximity Between Adult Children and Older Mothers in Sweden," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 50(3), pages 903-931, June.
    7. repec:spr:demogr:v:54:y:2017:i:5:d:10.1007_s13524-017-0604-0 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Kwan Ok Lee & Gary Painter, 2014. "Housing Tenure Transitions of Older Households: What is the Role of Child Proximity?," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 42(1), pages 109-152, March.
    9. admin, clsrn, 2011. "The Mom Effect: Family Proximity and the Labour Force Status of Women in Canada," CLSSRN working papers clsrn_admin-2011-30, Vancouver School of Economics, revised 28 Nov 2011.
    10. Compton, Janice & Pollak, Robert A., 2014. "Family proximity, childcare, and women’s labor force attachment," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 79(C), pages 72-90.
    11. García-Morán, Eva & Kuehn, Zoe, 2012. "With strings attached: Grandparent-provided child care, fertility, and female labor market outcomes," MPRA Paper 37001, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. repec:wly:quante:v:8:y:2017:i:1:p:277-316 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Shiko Maruyama & Meliyanni Johar, 2017. "Do siblings free‐ride in “being there” for parents?," Quantitative Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 8(1), pages 277-316, March.

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