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Pauvreté et stratification du marché du travail urbain au Maroc : éléments d'analyse


  • Jean-Philippe Karim El Aynaoui



This paper shows that there is a strong relation between urban poverty patterns and the functioning of the urban labor market in Morocco. There are strong evidences that labor markets in developping are characterised by substantial heterogeneity. Consequently, a model that do not handle this reality is not suitable to understand labor market processes outcomes. The paper presents an approach of labor market segmentation based on occupational differentials in terms of vulnerability. The paper argues that this approach provides a useful framework for understanding the mechanisms of the urban labor market underlying poverty. Based on data from a living standard measurement survey in Morocco, a cluster analysis, exclusively using occupational variables, enables to represent the labor market structure. The data analysis differentiates four groups in term of their degree of vulnerability on the urban labor market. The third step of this study is to document the patterns of poverty in connection with the stratification of the labor market. The analysis then shows that there is a tenuous relationship between occupational status - as idenfied by the cluster analysis - and the poverty. The study points out that two groups on the labor market are notably vulnerable to poverty. (Full text in French)

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  • Jean-Philippe Karim El Aynaoui, 1995. "Pauvreté et stratification du marché du travail urbain au Maroc : éléments d'analyse," Documents de travail 08, Groupe d'Economie du Développement de l'Université Montesquieu Bordeaux IV.
  • Handle: RePEc:mon:ceddtr:08

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Atkinson, A B, 1987. "On the Measurement of Poverty," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 55(4), pages 749-764, July.
    2. Foster, James & Greer, Joel & Thorbecke, Erik, 1984. "A Class of Decomposable Poverty Measures," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 52(3), pages 761-766, May.
    3. Haddad, Lawrence & Kanbur, Ravi, 1990. "How Serious Is the Neglect of Intra-Household Inequality?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 100(402), pages 866-881, September.
    4. Ravallion, Martin & Bidani, Benu, 1994. "How Robust Is a Poverty Profile?," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 8(1), pages 75-102, January.
    5. Jean-Pierre Lachaud, 1995. "Le secteur informel urbain et l'informalisation du travail en Afrique subsaharienne : rhétoriques et réalités - Le cas de la Côte d'Ivoire," Documents de travail 05, Groupe d'Economie du Développement de l'Université Montesquieu Bordeaux IV.
    6. Deaton, Angus S & Muellbauer, John, 1986. "On Measuring Child Costs: With Applications to Poor Countries," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(4), pages 720-744, August.
    7. Reich, Michael & Gordon, David M & Edwards, Richard C, 1973. "A Theory of Labor Market Segmentation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 63(2), pages 359-365, May.
    8. Kannappan, Subbiah, 1985. "Urban Employment and the Labor Market in Developing Nations," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 33(4), pages 699-730, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. François Combarnous, 1999. "La mise en oeuvre du modèle logistique multinomial emboîté dans l'analyse de la participation au marché du travail," Documents de travail 39, Groupe d'Economie du Développement de l'Université Montesquieu Bordeaux IV.
    2. Khalid Soudi, 2001. "Poverty and Vulnerability on the Labor Market: Some Dimensions of the Fragility of the Position of the Poor," Working Papers 0122, Economic Research Forum, revised 08 Feb 2001.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • O55 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Africa

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