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Immigrant Links, Diasporas and FDI. An Empirical Investigation on Five European Countrie

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  • Marina Murat

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  • Sara Flisi

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Abstract

This paper studies the effects of migration on the bilateral FDI of five European countries, Germany, Italy, France, UK and Spain. It is based on five datasets with time spans going from 1990 to 2006. It analyses the impacts of skilled and less-skilled immigrants, of skilled networks from developed and developing countries and, for Italy and Spain, of emigrants. Results are that skilled immigrants, originating from both developed and developing countries, have positive and robust effects on the bilateral FDI of UK, Germany and France. The FDI of Italy and Spain are influenced by their respective diasporas.

Suggested Citation

  • Marina Murat & Sara Flisi, 2009. "Immigrant Links, Diasporas and FDI. An Empirical Investigation on Five European Countrie," Center for Economic Research (RECent) 032, University of Modena and Reggio E., Dept. of Economics "Marco Biagi".
  • Handle: RePEc:mod:recent:032
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Docquier, Frederic & Rapoport, Hillel, 2004. "Skilled migration: the perspective of developing countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3382, The World Bank.
    2. Marina Murat & Barbara Pistoresi, 2009. "Migrant Networks: Empirical Implications for the Italian Bilateral Trade," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(3), pages 371-390.
    3. Simon Commander & Mari Kangasniemi & L. Alan Winters, 2004. "The Brain Drain: Curse or Boon? A Survey of the Literature," NBER Chapters,in: Challenges to Globalization: Analyzing the Economics, pages 235-278 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Sarah Y. Tong, 2005. "Ethnic Networks in FDI and the Impact of Institutional Development," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 9(4), pages 563-580, November.
    5. Marina Murat & Barbara Pistoresi, 2009. "Emigrant and immigrant networks in FDI," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(12), pages 1261-1264.
    6. Kugler, Maurice & Rapoport, Hillel, 2007. "International labor and capital flows: Complements or substitutes?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 94(2), pages 155-162, February.
    7. James E. Rauch, 2001. "Business and Social Networks in International Trade," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 39(4), pages 1177-1203, December.
    8. Trefler, Daniel, 1995. "The Case of the Missing Trade and Other Mysteries," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(5), pages 1029-1046, December.
    9. Gould, David M, 1994. "Immigrant Links to the Home Country: Empirical Implications for U.S. Bilateral Trade Flows," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 76(2), pages 302-316, May.
    10. James E. Rauch & Vitor Trindade, 2002. "Ethnic Chinese Networks In International Trade," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 84(1), pages 116-130, February.
    11. Keith Head & John Ries, 1998. "Immigration and Trade Creation: Econometric Evidence from Canada," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 31(1), pages 47-62, February.
    12. Gao, Ting, 2003. "Ethnic Chinese networks and international investment: evidence from inward FDI in China," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(4), pages 611-629, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Peter Nijkamp & Masood Gheasi & Piet Rietveld, 2011. "Migrants and International Economic Linkages: A Meta-Overview," Spatial Economic Analysis, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(4), pages 359-376, July.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    migration; networks; diasporas; FDI;

    JEL classification:

    • F21 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Investment; Long-Term Capital Movements
    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business

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