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Toward the 24-Hour Knowledge Factory


  • Gupta, Amar
  • Seshasai, Satwik


The term 24-Hour Knowledge Factory connotes a globally distributed work environment in which members of the global team work on a project around the clock; each member of the team works the normal workday hours that pertain to his or her time zone. At the end of such a workday, a fellow team member located in a different time zone continues the same task. This creates the shift-style workforce that was originally conceived in the manufacturing sector. A globally distributed 24-hour call center is the simplest manifestation of this paradigm. The true example of the 24-hour factory paradigm discussed in this paper involves groups working together to accomplish a given set of deliverables, such as a software project, and transcending conventional spatial and temporal boundaries.

Suggested Citation

  • Gupta, Amar & Seshasai, Satwik, 2004. "Toward the 24-Hour Knowledge Factory," Working papers 4455-03, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Sloan School of Management.
  • Handle: RePEc:mit:sloanp:5057

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    Cited by:

    1. Jarle Hildrum & Dieter Ernst & Jan Fagerberg, 2011. "The Complex Interaction between Global Production Networks, Digital Information Systems and International Knowledge Transfers," Chapters,in: Handbook on the Economic Complexity of Technological Change, chapter 16 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Myriam Karoui & Ali Gürkan & Aurélie Dudezert, 2010. "Virtual Team Collaboration: A Review of Literature and Perspectives," Post-Print hal-00509753, HAL.
    3. Amandine Pascal & Catherine Thomas, 2014. "A design theory for collaborative interorganizational knowledge management systems," Post-Print halshs-01059585, HAL.
    4. Myriam Karoui & Aurélie Dudezert, 2010. "La collaboration centrée sur le partage de connaissances et de l'information au sein des équipes virtuelles : revue de littérature et perspectives de recherche," Post-Print hal-00509749, HAL.
    5. Ceci, Federica & Prencipe, Andrea, 2013. "Does Distance Hinder Coordination? Identifying and Bridging Boundaries of Offshored Work," Journal of International Management, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 324-332.
    6. Edward Anderson, 2014. "Time differences, communication and trade: longitude matters II," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 150(2), pages 337-369, May.
    7. Bertolotti, Fabiola & Mattarelli, Elisa & Vignoli, Matteo & Macrì, Diego Maria, 2015. "Exploring the relationship between multiple team membership and team performance: The role of social networks and collaborative technology," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(4), pages 911-924.
    8. repec:wsi:jikmxx:v:08:y:2009:i:01:n:s0219649209002208 is not listed on IDEAS

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