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Asymmetric Impact of Relative Price Shocks in Presence of Trend Inflation

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  • Sartaj Rasool Rather

    () (Assistant Professor, Madras School of Economics)

Abstract

This study examines whether skewness of cross sectional distribution of relative price shocks has asymmetric impact on aggregate inflation. The empirical evidence from various countries suggests that the positively skewed shocks have different impact from that of negatively skewed shocks on aggregate inflation. Consistent with the predictions of menu cost models, the empirical results indicate that this asymmetry in the impact of relative price shocks mainly depends on the nature of trend that inflation exhibits for a given period. The crucial inference that emerges from the empirical findings is that the traditional approach of using a linear regression model, to examine the relationship between inflation and skewness during the period with trend inflation, is not appropriate as it may result in misspecification and misleading conclusions.

Suggested Citation

  • Sartaj Rasool Rather, 2016. "Asymmetric Impact of Relative Price Shocks in Presence of Trend Inflation," Working Papers 2016-153, Madras School of Economics,Chennai,India.
  • Handle: RePEc:mad:wpaper:2016-153
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Richard De Abreu Lourenco & David Gruen, 1995. "Price Stickiness and Inflation," RBA Research Discussion Papers rdp9502, Reserve Bank of Australia.
    2. Ball, Laurence & Mankiw, N Gregory, 1994. "Asymmetric Price Adjustment and Economic Fluctuations," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 104(423), pages 247-261, March.
    3. Sartaj Rasool Rather & Sunil Paul & S. Raja Sethu Durai, 2015. "Inflation forecasting and the distribution of price changes," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 35(1), pages 226-232.
    4. M. Angeles Caraballo & Carlos Usabiaga, 2009. "The relevance of supply shocks for inflation: the spanish case," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(6), pages 753-764.
    5. Laurence Ball & N. Gregory Mankiw, 1995. "Relative-Price Changes as Aggregate Supply Shocks," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 110(1), pages 161-193.
    6. Robert Amano & Tiff Macklem, 1997. "Menu Costs, Relative Prices, and Inflation: Evidence for Canada," Staff Working Papers 97-14, Bank of Canada.
    7. Shruti Tripathi & Ashima Goyal, 2011. "Relative prices, the price level and inflation: Effects of asymmetric and sticky adjustment," Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai Working Papers 2011-026, Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai, India.
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    11. Luc Aucremanne & Guy Brys & Peter J Rousseeuw & Anja Struyf & Mia Hubert, 2003. "Inflation, relative prices and nominal rigidities," BIS Papers chapters,in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Monetary policy in a changing environment, volume 19, pages 81-105 Bank for International Settlements.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Inflation; distribution of relative price shocks; menu costs; asymmetry;

    JEL classification:

    • E30 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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