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On the determinants of italian trade pattern

  • Paolo Epifani

The main feature of the italian trade pattern is the polarization of revealed comparative advantage in the traditional labor intensive sectors. This seems at odds with the fact that Italy is a high-income industrial country. In this paper, we argue that this peculiar trade structure can be explained by the joint interaction of increasing returns to scale and factor proportions. In other words, the two main theories of international trade turn out to be useful in order to account for the current structure of italian revealed comparative advantage and its evolution in the last decades.

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Paper provided by Cattaneo University (LIUC) in its series LIUC Papers in Economics with number 51.

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Length: 32 pages
Date of creation: Mar 1998
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:liu:liucec:51
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  1. Thomas J. Holmes, 1995. "Localization of industry and vertical disintegration," Staff Report 190, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  2. Leamer, Edward E & Bowen, Harry P, 1981. "Cross-Section Tests of the Heckscher-Ohlin Theorem: Comment [Factor Abundance and Comparative Advantage]," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 71(5), pages 1040-43, December.
  3. Ethier, Wilfred J, 1982. "Decreasing Costs in International Trade and Frank Graham's Argument for Protection," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(5), pages 1243-68, September.
  4. Faini, Riccardo, 1984. "Increasing Returns, Non-Traded Inputs and Regional Development," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 94(374), pages 308-23, June.
  5. Balassa, Bela, 1979. "The Changing Pattern of Comparative Advantage in Manufactured Goods," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 61(2), pages 259-66, May.
  6. Balassa, Bela & Noland, Marcus, 1989. "The changing comparative advantage of Japan and the United States," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 3(2), pages 174-188, June.
  7. Deardorff, Alan V., 1984. "Testing trade theories and predicting trade flows," Handbook of International Economics, in: R. W. Jones & P. B. Kenen (ed.), Handbook of International Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 10, pages 467-517 Elsevier.
  8. Balassa, Bela, 1986. "Comparative Advantage in Manufactured Goods: A Reappraisal," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 68(2), pages 315-19, May.
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