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Counting the Cost of the Intifada: Consumption,Saving and Political Instability in Israel

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  • David Fielding

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Abstract

In this paper we investigate some of the ways in which short-term variations in the magnitude of political instability can impact on macroeconomic performance, taking the example of Israel since 1987. Several indicators of political instability are found to have a significant impact on aggregate consumption and savings, and explain a large part of poor Israeli savings performance over recent years.

Suggested Citation

  • David Fielding, 2000. "Counting the Cost of the Intifada: Consumption,Saving and Political Instability in Israel," Discussion Papers in Economics 00/8, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.
  • Handle: RePEc:lec:leecon:00/8
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    File URL: http://www.le.ac.uk/economics/research/RePEc/lec/leecon/econ00-8.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Yaron Zelekha & Ohad Bar-Efrat, 2011. "Crime, Terror and Corruption and Their Effect on Private Investment in Israel," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 22(4), pages 635-648, September.
    2. David Fielding & Anja Shortland, 2009. "Does television terrify tourists? Effects of US television news on demand for tourism in Israel," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 38(3), pages 245-263, June.
    3. David Fielding & Madeline Penny, 2006. "What Causes Changes in Opinion about the Israeli-Palestinian Peace Process?," Working Papers 0601, University of Otago, Department of Economics, revised Mar 2006.
    4. Martin Gassebner & Richard Jong‐A‐Pin & Jochen O. Mierau, 2011. "Terrorism And Cabinet Duration," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 52(4), pages 1253-1270, November.
    5. Bruno S. Frey & Simon Luechinger & Alois Stutzer, 2007. "Calculating Tragedy: Assessing The Costs Of Terrorism," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 21(1), pages 1-24, February.
    6. Claude Berrebi & Hanan Yonah, 2016. "Terrorism and philanthropy: the effect of terror attacks on the scope of giving by individuals and households," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 169(3), pages 171-194, December.
    7. Jonathan Benchimol & Makram El-Shagi, 2017. "Forecast Performance in Times of Terrorism," CFDS Discussion Paper Series 2017/1, Center for Financial Development and Stability at Henan University, Kaifeng, Henan, China.
    8. Berrebi, Claude & Klor, Esteban F, 2005. "The Impact of Terrorism Across Industries: An Empirical Study," CEPR Discussion Papers 5360, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    9. Ben Bassat Avi & Dahan Momi & Geys Benny & Klor Esteban F., 2012. "The Impact of the Economic Costs of Conflict on Individuals' Political Attitudes," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 18(2), pages 1-29, August.
    10. repec:kap:pubcho:v:173:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s11127-017-0477-1 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Bruno S. Frey & Simon Luechinger & Alois Stutzer, "undated". "Valuing Public Goods: The Life Satisfaction Approach," IEW - Working Papers 184, Institute for Empirical Research in Economics - University of Zurich.
    12. Ruiz Estrada, Mario Arturo & Koutronas, Evangelos, 2016. "Terrorist attack assessment: Paris November 2015 and Brussels March 2016," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 38(3), pages 553-571.
    13. William F. Shughart, 2011. "Terrorism in Rational Choice Perspective," Chapters,in: The Handbook on the Political Economy of War, chapter 8 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    14. Nicole Crain & W. Crain, 2006. "Terrorized economies," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 128(1), pages 317-349, July.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Israel; Saving; Consumption; Political Instability;

    JEL classification:

    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development

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