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Differences in Wage-Determination Systems between Regular and Non-Regular Employment in a Kaleckian Model

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  • Ryunosuke Sonoda
  • Hiroaki Sasaki

Abstract

In this study, we build a Kaleckian model incorporating institutional differences between the wage determination of regular employment and that of non-regular employment. Using this model, we investigate how an employment shift toward regular workers affects the capacity utilization rate and income distribution. Our results show that while such shift in employment decreases the capacity utilization rate and increases the wage share of regular workers, it either increases or decreases the wage share of non-regular workers. An increase in the flexibility of the labor market, as seen in an employment shift toward non-regular workers, increases the amplitude of business cycles. However, the introduction of a minimum wage fornon-regular workers stabilizes the economy.

Suggested Citation

  • Ryunosuke Sonoda & Hiroaki Sasaki, 2015. "Differences in Wage-Determination Systems between Regular and Non-Regular Employment in a Kaleckian Model," Discussion papers e-14-018, Graduate School of Economics Project Center, Kyoto University.
  • Handle: RePEc:kue:dpaper:e-14-018
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Peter Flaschel & Alfred Greiner, 2011. "Dual Labor Markets And The Impact Of Minimum Wages On Atypical Employment," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 62(3), pages 512-531, July.
    2. Hiroaki Sasaki, 2016. "Profit sharing and its effect on income distribution and output: a Kaleckian approach," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 40(2), pages 469-489.
    3. Matthieu Charpe & Peter Flaschel & Hans-Martin Krolzig & Christian Proaño & Willi Semmler & Daniele Tavani, 2015. "Credit-driven investment, heterogeneous labor markets and macroeconomic dynamics," Journal of Economic Interaction and Coordination, Springer;Society for Economic Science with Heterogeneous Interacting Agents, vol. 10(1), pages 163-181, April.
    4. Luigi L. Pasinetti, 1962. "Rate of Profit and Income Distribution in Relation to the Rate of Economic Growth," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 29(4), pages 267-279.
    5. Srinivas Raghavendra, 2006. "Limits to Investment Exhilarationism," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 87(3), pages 257-280, April.
    6. Sasaki, Hiroaki & Matsuyama, Jun & Sako, Kazumitsu, 2013. "The macroeconomic effects of the wage gap between regular and non-regular employment and of minimum wages," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 26(C), pages 61-72.
    7. Tavani, Daniele & Vasudevan, Ramaa, 2014. "Capitalists, workers, and managers: Wage inequality and effective demand," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 120-131.
    8. Peter Flaschel & Alfred Greiner & Camille Logeay & Christian Proano, 2012. "Employment cycles, low income work and the dynamic impact of wage regulations. A macro perspective," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 22(2), pages 235-250, April.
    9. Peter Flaschel & Alfred Greiner & Sigrid Luchtenberg, 2012. "Labor Market Institutions and the Role of Elites in Flexicurity Societies," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(1), pages 103-129, January.
    10. Thomas I. Palley, 2015. "The middle class in macroeconomics and growth theory: a three-class neo-Kaleckian–Goodwin model," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 39(1), pages 221-243.
    11. Marc Lavoie, 2009. "Cadrisme within a Post-Keynesian Model of Growth and Distribution," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(3), pages 369-391.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    wage gap; regular and non-regular employment; demand-led growth model;

    JEL classification:

    • E12 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Keynes; Keynesian; Post-Keynesian; Modern Monetary Theory
    • E25 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Aggregate Factor Income Distribution
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

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