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Are More Start-Ups Really Better? Quantity and Quality of New Businesses and Their Effect on Regional Development

Author

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  • Michael Fritsch

    () (Friedrich Schiller University Jena, School of Economics and Business Administration)

  • Alexandra Schroeter

    () (Friedrich Schiller University Jena, School of Economics and Business Administration)

Abstract

Empirical analyses suggest that the employment creating effect of start-ups is highest in regions with a low level of new business formation and that an increase in the regional start-up rate beyond a certain level may lead to negative employment effect. In explaining these results, we assume that the average quality of regional start-ups decreases with the number of start-ups, while the costs of the induced resource reallocation increase. Our model implies that it is not the number of start-ups but their quality that is decisive for their effect on economic development. Therefore, a policy aiming at stimulating economic growth through entrepreneurship should focus on high-quality start-ups.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael Fritsch & Alexandra Schroeter, 2009. "Are More Start-Ups Really Better? Quantity and Quality of New Businesses and Their Effect on Regional Development," Jena Economic Research Papers 2009-070, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
  • Handle: RePEc:jrp:jrpwrp:2009-070
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Michael Fritsch & Alexandra Schroeter, 2011. "Does Quality make a Difference? Employment Effects of High- and Low-Quality Start-ups," ERSA conference papers ersa10p1400, European Regional Science Association.
    2. Bos Jaap W.B. & Stam Erik, 2011. "Gazelles, Industry Growth and Structural Change," Research Memorandum 018, Maastricht University, Maastricht Research School of Economics of Technology and Organization (METEOR).
    3. Sarah Kösters, 2010. "Subsidizing Start-Ups: Policy Targeting and Policy Effectiveness," Journal of Industry, Competition and Trade, Springer, vol. 10(3), pages 199-225, September.
    4. Kent Eliasson & Hans Westlund, 2013. "Attributes influencing self-employment propensity in urban and rural Sweden," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 50(2), pages 479-514, April.
    5. Florian Noseleit, 2013. "Entrepreneurship, structural change, and economic growth," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 23(4), pages 735-766, September.
    6. László Szerb & Éva Komlósi & Balázs Páger, 2016. "Measuring Entrepreneurship and Optimizing Entrepreneurship Policy Efforts in the European Union," ifo DICE Report, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 14(3), pages 08-23, October.
    7. Michael Fritsch & Sebastian von Engelhardt, 2010. "Who Starts with Open Source? Institutional Choice of Start-Ups in the German ICT Sector," Jena Economic Research Papers 2010-049, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
    8. Ioannis Giotopoulos & Alexandra Kontolaimou & Aggelos Tsakanikas, 2017. "Drivers of high-quality entrepreneurship: what changes did the crisis bring about?," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 48(4), pages 913-930, April.
    9. repec:ces:ifodic:v:14:y:2016:i:3:p:19255694 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Andersson, Martin & Baltzopoulos, Apostolos & Lööf, Hans, 2012. "R&D strategies and entrepreneurial spawning," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 54-68.
    11. Jaap W. B. Bos & Erik Stam, 2014. "Gazelles and industry growth: a study of young high-growth firms in The Netherlands," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 23(1), pages 145-169, February.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Entrepreneurship; new business formation; regional development; entrepreneurship policy;

    JEL classification:

    • L26 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Entrepreneurship
    • M13 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - New Firms; Startups
    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development
    • O18 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Urban, Rural, Regional, and Transportation Analysis; Housing; Infrastructure
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes

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