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How Bad is Globalization for Labour Standards in the North?

Author

Listed:
  • Alejando Donado

    () (Department of Economics, University of Würzburg, Germany)

  • Klaus Wälde

    (Gutenberg School of Management and Economics, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Germany)

Abstract

We analyse a world consisting of 'the North'and 'the South' where labour stan- dards in the North are set by trade unions. Standards set by unions tend to increase output and welfare. There are no unions in the South and work stan- dards are suboptimal. Trade between these two countries can imply a reduction in work standards in the North. Moreover, when trade unions are established in the South, the North, including northern unions, tend to lose. Quantitatively, these effects are small and overcompensated by gains in the South. The existing empirical literature tends to support our findings.

Suggested Citation

  • Alejando Donado & Klaus Wälde, 2010. "How Bad is Globalization for Labour Standards in the North?," Working Papers 1011, Gutenberg School of Management and Economics, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, revised 19 Aug 2010.
  • Handle: RePEc:jgu:wpaper:1011
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    occupational health and safety; trade unions; international trade; welfare;

    JEL classification:

    • J51 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor-Management Relations, Trade Unions, and Collective Bargaining - - - Trade Unions: Objectives, Structure, and Effects
    • J81 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Standards - - - Working Conditions
    • F16 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade and Labor Market Interactions
    • F21 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Investment; Long-Term Capital Movements

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