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Past, Present and Future Compensation Research: Economist Perspectives


  • Gibbs, Michael

    () (University of Chicago)


At the 2016 Academy of Management Conference, a group of distinguished compensation researchers held a panel discussion on the future of compensation research. Their remarks were compiled into an article published in this issue. Soon after the panel, Charles Fay commissioned a similar discussion by leading economists (Michael Gibbs, Kevin Hallock, Edward Lazear, Kevin J. Murphy & Canice Prendergast) doing compensation research; this article is the result.

Suggested Citation

  • Gibbs, Michael, 2017. "Past, Present and Future Compensation Research: Economist Perspectives," IZA Discussion Papers 10671, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp10671

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Wooden, Mark, 2001. "Union Wage Effects in the Presence of Enterprise Bargaining," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 77(236), pages 1-18, March.
    2. Colin P. Green & Gareth D. Leeves, 2013. "Job Security, Financial Security and Worker Well-being: New Evidence on the Effects of Flexible Employment," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 60(2), pages 121-138, May.
    3. Hielke Buddelmeyer & Duncan McVicar & Mark Wooden, 2015. "Non-Standard “Contingent” Employment and Job Satisfaction: A Panel Data Analysis," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 54(2), pages 256-275, April.
    4. Colin Green & Parvinder Kler & Gareth Leeves, 2010. "Flexible Contract Workers in Inferior Jobs: Reappraising the Evidence," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 48(3), pages 605-629, September.
    5. Lixin Cai & Amy Y.C. Liu, 2008. "Union Wage Effects in Australia: Is There Variation along the Distribution?," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 84(267), pages 496-510, December.
    6. Antje Mertens & Vanessa Gash & Frances McGinnity, 2007. "The Cost of Flexibility at the Margin. Comparing the Wage Penalty for Fixed-term Contracts in Germany and Spain using Quantile Regression," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 21(4-5), pages 637-666, December.
    7. Michael D. S. Morris & Alexander Vekker, 2001. "An Alternative Look at Temporary Workers, Their Choices, and the Growth in Temporary Employment," Journal of Labor Research, Transaction Publishers, vol. 22(2), pages 373-390, April.
    8. Simona COMI & Mara GRASSENI, 2009. "Are Temporary Workers Discriminated Against? Evidence from Europe," CHILD Working Papers wp17_09, CHILD - Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic economics - ITALY.
    9. Mirko Draca & Colin Green, 2004. "The Incidence and Intensity of Employer Funded Training: Australian Evidence on the Impact of Flexible Work," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 51(5), pages 609-625, November.
    10. Giulio Bosio, 2014. "The Implications of Temporary Jobs on the Distribution of Wages in Italy: An Unconditional IVQTE Approach," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 28(1), pages 64-86, March.
    11. Bosio, Giulio, 2009. "Temporary employment and wage gap with permanent jobs: evidence from quantile regression," MPRA Paper 16055, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Antje Mertens & Frances McGinnity, 2005. "A “Two-Tier” Labour Market for Fixed-Term Jobs? Evaluating Evidence from West Germany Using Quantile Regression," Schmollers Jahrbuch : Journal of Applied Social Science Studies / Zeitschrift für Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften, Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, vol. 125(1), pages 75-85.
    13. Renato Faccini, 2014. "Reassessing Labour Market Reforms: Temporary Contracts as a Screening Device," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 124(575), pages 167-200, March.
    14. Assar Lindbeck & Dennis J. Snower, 2001. "Insiders versus Outsiders," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 15(1), pages 165-188, Winter.
    15. Rocio Bonet & Cristina Cruz & Daniel Fernández Kranz & Rachida Justo, 2013. "Temporary Contracts and Work—Family Balance in a Dual Labor Market," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 66(1), pages 55-87, January.
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    More about this item


    compensation; incentives; evaluation; intrinsic motivation;

    JEL classification:

    • J3 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs
    • M5 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics

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