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Horizontal inequity in access to health care in four South American cities

Author

Listed:
  • Ana I. Balsa

    (University of Miami)

  • Máximo Rossi

    (Universidad de la República (Uruguay))

  • Patricia Triunfo

    (Universidad de la República (Uruguay))

Abstract

This paper analyzes and compares socioeconomic inequalities in the use of healthcare services by the elderly in four South-American cities: Buenos Aires (Argentina), Santiago (Chile), Montevideo (Uruguay) and San Pablo (Brazil). We use data from SABE, a survey on Health, Well-being and Aging administered in several Latin American cities in 2000. After having accounted for socioeconomic inequalities in healthcare needs, we find socioeconomic inequities favoring the rich in the use of preventive services (mammograms, pap tests, breast examinations, and prostate exams) in all of the studied cities. We also find inequities in the likelihood of having a medical visit in Santiago and Montevideo, and in some measures of quality of access in Santiago, Sao Paulo, and Buenos Aires. Santiago depicts the highest inequities in medical visits and Uruguay the worse indicators in mammograms and pap scans tests. For all cities, inequities in preventive services at least double inequities in other services. We do not find evidence of a trade-off between levels of access and equity in access to healthcare services. The decomposition of healthcare inequalities suggests that inequities within each health system (public or private) are more important than between systems.

Suggested Citation

  • Ana I. Balsa & Máximo Rossi & Patricia Triunfo, 2009. "Horizontal inequity in access to health care in four South American cities," Working Papers 131, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
  • Handle: RePEc:inq:inqwps:ecineq2009-131
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    File URL: http://www.ecineq.org/milano/WP/ECINEQ2009-131.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Cecilia González & Patricia Triunfo, 2018. "Inequidad en el acceso a los servicios de salud en Uruguay," Documentos de Trabajo (working papers) 0718, Department of Economics - dECON.
    2. Shreya Banerjee & Indrani Roy Chowdhury, 2020. "Inequities in curative health-care utilization among the adult population (20–59 years) in India: A comparative analysis of NSS 71st (2014) and 75th (2017–18) rounds," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 15(11), pages 1-23, November.
    3. Fiorillo Damiano & Sabatini Fabio, 2011. "Quality and quantity: The role of social interactions in individual health," wp.comunite 0073, Department of Communication, University of Teramo.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    inequalities; healthcare; medical visit; preventive services.;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I1 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health
    • I11 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Analysis of Health Care Markets
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health

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