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Forecasting euro exchange rates: How much does model averaging help?


  • Jesus Crespo Cuaresma



We analyze the performance of Bayesian model averaged exchange rate forecasts for euro/US dollar, euro/Japanese yen, euro/Swiss franc and euro/British pound rates using weights based on the out-of-sample predictive likelihood. The paper also presents a simple stratified sampling procedure in the spirit of Sala i Martin et alia (2004) to obtain model weights based on predictive accuracy. Our results indicate that accounting explicitly for model uncertainty when constructing predictions of euro exchange rates leads to improvements in predictive accuracy as measured by the mean square forecast error. While the forecasting error of the combined forecast tends to be systematically smaller than that of the individual model that would have been chosen based on predictive accuracy in a test sample, random walk forecasts cannot be beaten significantly in terms of squared forecast errors. Direction of change statistics, on the other hand, are significantly improved by Bayesian model averaging.

Suggested Citation

  • Jesus Crespo Cuaresma, "undated". "Forecasting euro exchange rates: How much does model averaging help?," Working Papers 2007-24, Faculty of Economics and Statistics, University of Innsbruck.
  • Handle: RePEc:inn:wpaper:2007-24

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    6. repec:feb:artefa:0094 is not listed on IDEAS
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    Cited by:

    1. Oxana Babecká-Kucharèuková, 2009. "Transmission of Exchange Rate Shocks into Domestic Inflation: The Case of the Czech Republic," Czech Journal of Economics and Finance (Finance a uver), Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, vol. 59(2), pages 137-152, June.
    2. Costantini, Mauro & Cuaresma, Jesus Crespo & Hlouskova, Jaroslava, 2014. "Can Macroeconomists Get Rich Forecasting Exchange Rates?," Economics Series 305, Institute for Advanced Studies.
    3. Martin Feldkircher, 2012. "Forecast Combination and Bayesian Model Averaging: A Prior Sensitivity Analysis," Journal of Forecasting, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 31(4), pages 361-376, July.

    More about this item


    Forecasting; model averaging; Bayesian econometrics; exchange rates.;

    JEL classification:

    • C11 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Bayesian Analysis: General
    • C53 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Forecasting and Prediction Models; Simulation Methods
    • F31 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Exchange


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