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Exchange rate regimes and macroeconomic performance in South Asia

Author

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  • Ashima Goyal

    (Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research)

Abstract

Stylized facts for South Asia show the dominance of supply shocks, amplified by macroeconomic policies and procyclical current accounts. Interest and exchange rate volatility rose initially on liberalization, but fell as markets deepened. A gradual middling through approach to openness and market development are helping the region absorb shocks without reducing growth. Diverse sources of demand, flexible exchange rates, robust domestic savings, and changing political preferences are contributing. Countercyclical policy more suited to structure, and removal of distortions raising costs, would allow better coordination of monetary and fiscal polices to further support the process.

Suggested Citation

  • Ashima Goyal, 2010. "Exchange rate regimes and macroeconomic performance in South Asia," Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai Working Papers 2010-005, Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai, India.
  • Handle: RePEc:ind:igiwpp:2010-005
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    File URL: http://www.igidr.ac.in/pdf/publication/WP-2010-005.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Mark Aguiar & Gita Gopinath, 2007. "Emerging Market Business Cycles: The Cycle Is the Trend," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 115, pages 69-102.
    2. Ashima Goyal, 2011. "Sustainable debt and deficits in Emerging Markets," International Journal of Trade and Global Markets, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 4(2), pages 113-136.
    3. Goyal, Ashima & Pujari, Ayan Kumar, 2005. "Identifying long run supply curve of India," MPRA Paper 24021, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Ashima Goyal, 2007. "Tradeoffs, Delegation and Fiscal-Monetary Coordination in a Developing Economy," Indian Economic Review, Department of Economics, Delhi School of Economics, vol. 42(2), pages 141-164, December.
    5. Goyal, Ashima, 1999. "The Political Economy of the Revenue Deficit," MPRA Paper 29980, University Library of Munich, Germany.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ashima Goyal, 2010. "Inflationary pressures in South Asia," Asia-Pacific Development Journal, United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP), vol. 17(2), pages 1-42, December.
    2. Ms. Janet Gale Stotsky & Mr. Manuk Ghazanchyan & Qianqian Zhang, 2015. "A New Look at the Determinants of Growth in Asian Countries," IMF Working Papers 2015/195, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Goyal, Ashima & Arora, Sanchit, 2016. "Estimating the Indian natural interest rate: A semi-structural approach," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 141-153.
    4. Ashima Goyal & Abhishek Kumar, 2018. "The effect of oil shocks and cyclicality in hiding Indian twin deficits," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 45(1), pages 27-45, January.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    South Asia; supply shocks; flexible exchange rates; diversity; distortions;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E3 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles
    • E63 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Comparative or Joint Analysis of Fiscal and Monetary Policy; Stabilization; Treasury Policy
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development

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