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The Use of Time and Technology by Households in the United States

Author

Listed:
  • Stafford, Frank

    (The University of Michigan)

  • Duncan, Greg J.

    (The University of Michigan)

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Stafford, Frank & Duncan, Greg J., 1979. "The Use of Time and Technology by Households in the United States," Working Paper Series 21, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:iuiwop:0021
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    File URL: http://www.ifn.se/wfiles/wp/wp021.pdf
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Mincer, Jacob, 1997. "The Production of Human Capital and the Life Cycle of Earnings: Variations on a Theme," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 15(1), pages 26-47, January.
    2. Casey B. Mulligan & Xavier Sala-i-Martin, 1999. "Gerontocracy, retirement, and social security," Economics Working Papers 383, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
    3. Rosen, Harvey S, 1980. "What Is Labor Supply and Do Taxes Affect It?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 70(2), pages 171-176, May.
    4. Suzanne Clain & Charles Zech, 2008. "Determinants of the Allocation of Volunteer Time: Church-Related versus Other Non-market Activities," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 36(4), pages 455-467, December.
    5. canegrati, emanuele, 2006. "The Single-Mindedness Theory: Micro-foundation and Applications to Social Security Systems," MPRA Paper 1223, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Derek C. Jones & Srecko Goic, 2010. "Do Innovative Workplace Practices Foster Mutual Gains? Evidence From Croatia," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series wp993, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    7. Schettkat, Ronald, 2002. "Differences in US-German time-allocation: Why do Americans work longer hours than Germans?," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Labor Market Policy and Employment FS I 02-212, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).
    8. repec:eee:labchp:v:1:y:1986:i:c:p:387-423 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Jacob Mincer, 1991. "Education and Unemployment," NBER Working Papers 3838, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Jacob Mincer, 1988. "Job Training, Wage Growth, and Labor Turnover," NBER Working Papers 2690, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Biddle, Jeff E & Hamermesh, Daniel S, 1990. "Sleep and the Allocation of Time," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(5), pages 922-943, October.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Household behavior; Time allocation;

    JEL classification:

    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • P36 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Institutions and Their Transitions - - - Consumer Economics; Health; Education and Training; Welfare, Income, Wealth, and Poverty

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