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Pre- and Post-Birth Components of Intergenerational Persistence in Health and Longevity: Lessons from a Large Sample of Adoptees

Author

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  • Björkegren, Evelina

    (Department of Economics, Stockholm University)

  • Lindahl, Mikael

    () (Department of Economics, School of Business, Economics and Law, Göteborg University)

  • Palme, Mårten

    (Department of Economics, Stockholm University)

  • Simeonova, Emilia

    (Johns Hopkins University)

Abstract

We use data on a large sample of Swedish-born adoptees and their biological and adopting parents to decompose the persistence in health inequality across generations into pre-birth and post-birth components. We use three sets of measures for health outcomes in the second generation: mortality, measures based on data on hospitalization and, finally, measures using birth outcomes for the third generation. The results show that all of the persistence in mortality is transmitted solely via pre-birth factors, while the results for the hospitalization measures suggest that at least three quarters of the intergenerational persistence in health is attributable to the biological parents.

Suggested Citation

  • Björkegren, Evelina & Lindahl, Mikael & Palme, Mårten & Simeonova, Emilia, 2019. "Pre- and Post-Birth Components of Intergenerational Persistence in Health and Longevity: Lessons from a Large Sample of Adoptees," Working Papers in Economics 770, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:gunwpe:0770
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    Cited by:

    1. Norén, Anna, 2020. "Sick of my parents? Consequences of parental ill health on adult children," Working Paper Series 2020:1, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    2. Mohammad Mainul Hoque & Elizabeth King & Claudio E. Montenegro & Peter F. Orazem, 2020. "Life Expentancy at Birth and Lifetime Education and Earnings," Working Papers wp499, University of Chile, Department of Economics.
    3. Hoque, Mohammad Mainul & King, Elizabeth M. & Montenegro, Claudio E. & Orazem, Peter F., 2020. "Life Expectancy at Birth and Lifetime Education and Earnings," ISU General Staff Papers 202009010700001121, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Heath inequality; nature and nurture; intergenerational transmission;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • I14 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Inequality

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