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Use of Discrete Choice Experiments in health economics: An update of the literature


  • Rochelle Guttmann
  • Ryan Castle
  • Denzil G. Fiebig

    () (CHERE, University of Technology, Sydney)


The vast majority of stated preference research in health economics has been conducted in the random utility model paradigm using discrete choice experiments (DCEs). Ryan and Gerard (2003) have reviewed the applications of DCEs in the field of health economics. We have updated this initial work to include studies published between 2001 and 2007. Following the methods of Ryan and Gerard, we assess the later body of work, with respect to the key characteristics of DCEs such as selection of attributes and levels, experimental design, preference measurement, estimation procedure and validity. Comparisons between the periods are undertaken in order to identify any emerging trends.

Suggested Citation

  • Rochelle Guttmann & Ryan Castle & Denzil G. Fiebig, 2009. "Use of Discrete Choice Experiments in health economics: An update of the literature," Working Papers 2009/2, CHERE, University of Technology, Sydney.
  • Handle: RePEc:her:chewps:2009/2

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    File Function: First version, March 2009
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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Richard Norman & Paula Cronin & Rosalie Viney & Madeleine King & Deborah Street & John Brazier & Julie Ratcliffe, 2007. "Valuing EQ-5D health states: A review and analysis, CHERE Working Paper 2007/9," Working Papers 2007/9, CHERE, University of Technology, Sydney.
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    Cited by:

    1. Sonja Fagernäs & Panu Pelkonen, 2012. "Preferences and skills of Indian public sector teachers," IZA Journal of Labor & Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 1(1), pages 1-31, December.
    2. Sonja Fagernäs & Panu Pelkonen, 2011. "Whether to Hire Local Contract Teachers? Trade-off Between Skills and Preferences in India," SERC Discussion Papers 0083, Spatial Economics Research Centre, LSE.
    3. Jeff Bennett & Ekin Birol, 2010. "Introduction: The Roles and Significance of Choice Experiments in Developing Country Contexts," Chapters,in: Choice Experiments in Developing Countries, chapter 1 Edward Elgar Publishing.

    More about this item


    discrete choice experiments; health economics;

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General

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