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Economic Multipliers and Mega-Event Analysis

Author

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  • Victor Matheson

    () (Department of Economics, College of the Holy Cross)

Abstract

Critics of economic impact studies that purport to show that mega-events such as the Olympics bring large benefits to the communities “lucky” enough to host them frequently cite the use of inappropriate multipliers as a primary reason why these impact studies overstate the true economic gains to the hosts of these events. This brief paper shows in a numerical example how mega-events may lead to inflated multipliers and exaggerated claims of economic benefits.

Suggested Citation

  • Victor Matheson, 2004. "Economic Multipliers and Mega-Event Analysis," Working Papers 0402, College of the Holy Cross, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hcx:wpaper:0402
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    File URL: http://web.holycross.edu/RePEc/hcx/HC0402-Matheson_Multipliers.pdf
    File Function: Preliminary version, 2004
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. John J. Siegfried & Andrew Zimbalist, 2000. "The Economics of Sports Facilities and Their Communities," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 14(3), pages 95-114, Summer.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Luiz Martins de Melo, 2012. "The Case of Brazil 2014/2016," Chapters,in: International Handbook on the Economics of Mega Sporting Events, chapter 29 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Bouvet, Patrice, 2013. "Les « retombées » des évènements sportifs sont-elles celles que l’on croit ?," Revue de la Régulation - Capitalisme, institutions, pouvoirs, Association Recherche et Régulation, vol. 13.
    3. Robert Baumann & Bryan Engelhardt & Victor A. Matheson, 2012. "Labor Market Effects of the World Cup: A Sectoral Analysis," Chapters,in: International Handbook on the Economics of Mega Sporting Events, chapter 22 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    4. Robert Baumann & Victor Matheson & Chihiro Muroi, 2008. "Bowling in Hawaii: Examining the Effectiveness of Sports-Based Tourism Strategies," Working Papers 0808, College of the Holy Cross, Department of Economics.
    5. Robert Baumann & Victor A. Matheson, 2013. "Estimating economic impact using ex post econometric analysis: cautionary tales," Chapters,in: The Econometrics of Sport, chapter 10, pages 169-188 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    6. Robert A. Baade & Victor A. Matheson, 2016. "Going for the Gold: The Economics of the Olympics," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 30(2), pages 201-218, Spring.
    7. Robert Baade & Robert Baumann & Victor Matheson, 2005. "Selling the Big Game: Estimating the Economic Impact of Mega-Events through Taxable Sales," Working Papers 0510, College of the Holy Cross, Department of Economics.
    8. Victor Matheson, 2009. "Economics of the Super Bowl," Working Papers 0914, College of the Holy Cross, Department of Economics.
    9. M.R. van den Berg & M. de Nooij, 2013. "The bidding paradox: why economists, consultants and politicians disagree on the economic effects of mega sports events but might agree on their attractiveness," Working Papers 13-08, Utrecht School of Economics.
    10. Wladimir Andreff, 2012. "The winner's curse: why is the cost of sports mega-events so often underestimated?," Post-Print halshs-00703466, HAL.
    11. Stan du Plessis & Wolfgang Maennig, 2012. "The 2010 FIFA World Cup High-frequency Data Economics: Effects on International Tourism and Awareness for South Africa," Chapters,in: International Handbook on the Economics of Mega Sporting Events, chapter 27 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    12. Robert Baade & Robert Baumann & Victor Matheson, 2007. "Down, Set, Hike: The Economic Impact of College Football Games on Local Economies," Working Papers 0701, International Association of Sports Economists;North American Association of Sports Economists.
    13. Barajas, Ángel & Salgado, Jesyca & Sánchez, Patricio, 2012. "Problemática de los estudios de impacto económico de eventos deportivos /Problems to face in the Economic Impact of Sports Events Studies," Estudios de Economía Aplicada, Estudios de Economía Aplicada, vol. 30, pages 441-462, Agosto.
    14. Wladimir Andreff, 2012. "The winner's curse: why is the cost of sports mega-events so often underestimated?," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-00703466, HAL.
    15. Victor Matheson, 2004. "Is Smaller Better? A Comment on "Comparative Economic Impact Analyses" by Michael Mondello and Patrick Rishe," Working Papers 0407, College of the Holy Cross, Department of Economics.
    16. Robert A Baade & Robert Baumann & Victor A Matheson, 2009. "Rejecting “Conventional” Wisdom: Estimating the Economic Impact of National Political Conventions," Eastern Economic Journal, Palgrave Macmillan;Eastern Economic Association, vol. 35(4), pages 520-530.
    17. Victor Matheson, 2006. "Mega-Events: The effect of the world’s biggest sporting events on local, regional, and national economies," Working Papers 0610, College of the Holy Cross, Department of Economics.
    18. MATHESON, Victor & PEETERS, Thomas & SZYMANSKI, Stefan, 2012. "If you host it, where will they come from? Mega-Events and Tourism in South Africa," Working Papers 2012015, University of Antwerp, Faculty of Applied Economics.
    19. Robert Baade & Robert Baumann & Victor Matheson, 2005. "Predicting the Path to Recovery from Hurricane Katrina through the Lens of Hurricane Andrew and the Rodney King Riots," Working Papers 0515, College of the Holy Cross, Department of Economics.
    20. Zawadzki, Krystian & Wasilczuk, Julita, 2013. "Impact of the Euro 2012 on the Pomeranian Region and Its Small and Medium Enterprises in Terms of Competitiveness," MPRA Paper 44468, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    21. Robert Baumann & Bryan Engelhardt & Victor Matheson, 2009. "Hail to the Chief: Assessing the Economic Impact of Presidential Inaugurations on the Washington, D.C. Local Economy," Working Papers 0901, College of the Holy Cross, Department of Economics.
    22. Wladimir Andreff, 2012. "The Winner’s Curse: Why is the Cost of Mega Sporting Events so Often Underestimated?," Chapters,in: International Handbook on the Economics of Mega Sporting Events, chapter 4 Edward Elgar Publishing.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    economic impact; sports; sport economics; mega-events;

    JEL classification:

    • L83 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Sports; Gambling; Restaurants; Recreation; Tourism

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