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Monetary and budgetary-fiscal policy interactions in a Keynesian context: revisiting macroeconomic governance

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  • Angel Asensio

    () (CEPN - Centre d'Economie de l'Université Paris Nord (ancienne affiliation) - UP13 - Université Paris 13 - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

Abstract

Because it was designed for efficient stationary regimes, the New-Consensus Macroeconomic governance carries several drawbacks when implemented in Keynesian non-ergodic regimes. As long as Keynesian unemployment is interpreted in terms of 'natural' rate, it serves as a macroeconomic policy target in such a way that the policy mix may anchor the system far from full employment. We develop an argument that suggests a Keynesian explanation (which involves inappropriate economic policy) of what New Keynesians have referred to as unemployment hysteresis. However, difficulties do not vanish when authorities adopt the Keynesian vision of the world, for policy makers also have to deal with uncertainty. In contrast with the automatic economic-policy rules of the New Consensus Macroeconomics (NCM), we put forward a Keynesian pragmatic and progressive approach, based on intermediate targets designed with respect to the confidence that authorities have in the chances of success (which depends on the context and moves with it). Monetary and budgetary-fiscal policy interactions are discussed in such a context. Even if the monetary policy ability to reduce interest rates and increase effective demand is doubtful, it matters indirectly through avoiding increases in interest rates when fiscal and budgetary policy aims to stimulate effective demand.

Suggested Citation

  • Angel Asensio, 2005. "Monetary and budgetary-fiscal policy interactions in a Keynesian context: revisiting macroeconomic governance," Post-Print halshs-00139029, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:halshs-00139029
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-00139029
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Tobin, James, 1975. "Keynesian Models of Recession and Depression," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 65(2), pages 195-202, May.
    2. Philip Arestis & Malcolm Sawyer, 2003. "Reinventing fiscal policy," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(1), pages 3-25.
    3. Thomas J. Sargent & Neil Wallace, 1981. "Some unpleasant monetarist arithmetic," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, issue Fall.
    4. Marc Lavoie, 2006. "A Post-Keynesian Amendment To The New Consensus On Monetary Policy," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 57(2), pages 165-192, May.
    5. Philip Arestis & Malcolm Sawyer, 2003. "Inflation Targeting: A Critical Appraisal," Macroeconomics 0309015, EconWPA.
    6. Davidson, Paul, 1972. "Money and the Real World," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 82(325), pages 101-115, March.
    7. David H. Romer, 2000. "Keynesian Macroeconomics without the LM Curve," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 14(2), pages 149-169, Spring.
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    Keywords

    Monetary policy; fiscal policy; macroeconomic governance; post-Keynesian;

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