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Could Austerity Collapse the Economy of Puerto Rico?

Author

Listed:
  • Paul Carrillo

    (George Washington University)

  • Anthony Yezer

    (George Washington University)

  • Jozefina Kalaj

    (George Washington University)

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Paul Carrillo & Anthony Yezer & Jozefina Kalaj, 2017. "Could Austerity Collapse the Economy of Puerto Rico?," Working Papers 2017-17, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy.
  • Handle: RePEc:gwi:wpaper:2017-17
    as

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    File URL: http://www2.gwu.edu/~iiep/assets/docs/papers/2017WP/CarrilloIIEP2017-17.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Goodman, Allen C., 2013. "Is there an S in urban housing supply? or What on earth happened in Detroit?," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 179-191.
    2. Olivier J. Blanchard & Daniel Leigh, 2013. "Growth Forecast Errors and Fiscal Multipliers," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(3), pages 117-120, May.
    3. Jason Bram & Francisco E. Martinez & Charles Steindel, 2008. "Trends and developments in the economy of Puerto Rico," Current Issues in Economics and Finance, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, vol. 14(Mar).
    4. Felix Reichling & Charles Whalen, 2015. "The Fiscal Multiplier and Economic Policy Analysis in the United States: Working Paper 2015-02," Working Papers 49925, Congressional Budget Office.
    5. Andrew Hanson & Zackary Hawley, 2014. "The $10.10 Minimum Wage Proposal: An Evaluation across States," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 35(4), pages 323-345, December.
    6. Charles J. Whalen & Felix Reichling, 2015. "The Fiscal Multiplier And Economic Policy Analysis In The United States," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 33(4), pages 735-746, October.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Bankruptcy; Fiscal multiplier; Deficit;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • H4 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods
    • H7 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

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