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The monopolistic competition revolution in retrospect

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  • Brakman, Steven
  • Heijdra, Ben J.

    (Groningen University)

Abstract

In this paper we argue that there have been two monopolistic competition revolutions. The first was started by Joan Robinson and Edward Chamberlin in the 1930s but failed to have much impact on economic theory. The second was initiated by Avinash Dixit and Joseph Stiglitz in the early 1970s. Their revolution succeeded because it yielded an analytically tractable model of Chamberlinian monopolistic competition (the ``large group'' case). This model has been used in such diverse fields as international trade theory, economic geography, economic growth theory, and macroeconomics. Its popularity shows no sign of decline.

Suggested Citation

  • Brakman, Steven & Heijdra, Ben J., 2002. "The monopolistic competition revolution in retrospect," CCSO Working Papers 200215, University of Groningen, CCSO Centre for Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:gro:rugccs:200215
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    File URL: http://irs.ub.rug.nl/ppn/24255220X
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    Cited by:

    1. Henri L.F. de Groot & Jacques Poot & Martijn J. Smit, 2007. "Agglomeration, Innovation and Regional Development: Theoretical Perspectives and Meta-Analysis," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 07-079/3, Tinbergen Institute.
    2. Peter Schmidt, 2014. "EU regional policy and its theoretical foundations revisited," ERSA conference papers ersa14p1560, European Regional Science Association.
    3. Philipp vom Berge, 2013. "Search unemployment and new economic geography," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 50(3), pages 731-751, June.
    4. vom Berge, Philipp, 2011. "Search Unemployment and New Economic Geography," University of Regensburg Working Papers in Business, Economics and Management Information Systems 454, University of Regensburg, Department of Economics.
    5. Nocco, Antonella & Ottaviano, Gianmarco I.P. & Salto, Matteo, 2017. "Monopolistic competition and optimum product selection: Why and how heterogeneity matters," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(4), pages 704-717.
    6. By Albert G. Schweinberger & Jens Suedekum, 2015. "De-industrialization and entrepreneurship under monopolistic competition," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 67(4), pages 1174-1185.
    7. Henk Kox & Arjan Lejour, 2005. "Regulatory heterogeneity as obstacle for international services trade," CPB Discussion Paper 49, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
    8. Heijdra, Ben J. & Ligthart, Jenny E., 2007. "Fiscal policy, monopolistic competition, and finite lives," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 325-359, January.
    9. Kichko, Sergey & Kokovin, Sergey & Zhelobodko, Evgeny, 2014. "Trade patterns and export pricing under non-CES preferences," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(1), pages 129-142.
    10. Ronny Mazzocchi, 2013. "Investment-Saving Imbalances with Endogenous Capital Stock," DEM Discussion Papers 2013/14, Department of Economics and Management.
    11. Toru Kikuchi, 2010. "The Dixit-Stiglitz-Krugman Trade Model: A Geometric Note," Discussion Papers 1006, Graduate School of Economics, Kobe University.
    12. Belanger, Gilles, 2014. "The Overlooked Assumption Behind the New Keynesian Phillips Curve," MPRA Paper 55629, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. Jan Kranich, 2007. "Too much R&D? - Vertical differentiation in a model of monopolistic competition," Working Paper Series in Economics 59, University of Lüneburg, Institute of Economics.

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