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Regional Constructed Advantages - Relations between Business and Research Institutions in the Pomeranian Province


  • Joanna Kuczewska

    () (Faculty of Economics, University of Gdansk)


Regional competitiveness is the crucial area of research in modern economics. The European Union uses the regional competitiveness and divergences studies in creating the European Member States economies competitive advantages. Regional competitiveness determinates also the enterprises competitiveness advantages and plays the crucial role in creating their competitiveness position. The importance of the regional competiveness increases in the knowledge-based economy circumstances, where competitiveness depends on the ability to use knowledge, skills and attitudes of entrepreneurship. Regions are the leaders responsible for these resources mobilization so identification of their strengths and weaknesses allows to indicate the crucial growth tools. In terms of traditional concept, competitiveness is based on the classical theories of absolute advantage by Smith, Ricardo‘s comparative advantage to the first theory of Porter‘s competitive advantage. Modern knowledge-based economy creates a new approach to regional competitiveness researches – from the advanced Porter competitive advantage theory to the dynamic concept of constructed advantages. The key element of constructed advantages theory is an eclectic approach that combines a variety of different concepts such as Regional Innovation Systems, Triple Helix-concept and public-private partnership. They are characterized by multi-directional and multi-dimensional interactions between the actors of the economy. The purpose of the analysis is a preliminary assessment of selected economic relations between the entities in Pomeranian region. There be analyzed relations between business and research and development institutions with particular emphasis on the role of Science and Technology Park in Gdynia as an institution affecting the shape and strength of relationships that create advantages of the region.

Suggested Citation

  • Joanna Kuczewska, 2011. "Regional Constructed Advantages - Relations between Business and Research Institutions in the Pomeranian Province," Working Papers of Economics of European Integration Division 1106, The Univeristy of Gdansk, Faculty of Economics, Economics of European Integration Division.
  • Handle: RePEc:gda:wpaper:1106

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Ignazio Angeloni & André Sapir, 2011. "The international monetary system is changing: what opportunities and risks for the euro?," Working Papers 632, Bruegel.
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    7. George Tavlas, 1994. "The theory of monetary integration," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 5(2), pages 211-230, March.
    8. Bordo, Michael D. & Jonung, Lars, 2000. "A Return to the Convertibility Principle? Monetary And Fiscal Regimes in Historical Perspective," SSE/EFI Working Paper Series in Economics and Finance 415, Stockholm School of Economics.
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    More about this item


    regional competitiveness; constructed advantages; Triple Helix; Regional Innovations Systems; science and technological parks;

    JEL classification:

    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes
    • I25 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Economic Development
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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