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Channels of Interstate Risksharing: U.S. 1963-1990


  • Asdrubali, P.
  • Sorensen, B.E.
  • Yosha, O.


We develop a framework for quantifying the amount of risksharing among states in the US, and construct data which allow us to decompose a shock to gross state product into several components. For the period 1963-1990 we find that 40% of shocks to state gross domestic product are smoothed by capital markets, 14% are smoothed by the federal government, and 24% are smoothed by credit markets. The remaining 22% are not smoothed. We decompose the federal government smoothing into sub-categories: taxes, transfers, and grants to states, finding, for example, that in comparision to the tax-transfer system, the magnitude of smoothing through the grant system is small (2.7% of a shock), and that the unemployment insurance system smoothes 1.8% of a shock. Finally, we repeat the analysis for two sub-periods, finding that the amount and composition of federal government smoothing is stable through time. However, we detect an increase in the amount of capital markets smoothing, a sharp decrease in the amount of credit market smoothing, and a decrease in the overall fraction of a shock smoothed.
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  • Asdrubali, P. & Sorensen, B.E. & Yosha, O., 1995. "Channels of Interstate Risksharing: U.S. 1963-1990," Papers 07-95, Tel Aviv.
  • Handle: RePEc:fth:teavfo:07-95

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Asdrubali, Pierfederico & Kim, Soyoung, 2008. "On the empirics of international smoothing," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 374-381, March.
    2. Robert P. Flood & Nancy P. Marion & Akito Matsumoto, 2012. "International risk sharing during the globalization era," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 45(2), pages 394-416, May.
    3. Jääskelä, Jarkko, 1997. "Incomplete insurance market and its policy implication within European Monetary Union," Research Discussion Papers 8/1997, Bank of Finland.
    4. Philip R. Lane, 2000. "International Diversification and the Irish Economy," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 31(1), pages 37-53.
    5. Beetsma, Roel & Debrun, Xavier & Klaassen, Franc, 2001. "Is Fiscal Policy Coordination in EMU Desirable?," CEPR Discussion Papers 3035, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    6. Tullio Jappelli & Marco Pagano, 2008. "Financial Market Integration under EMU," European Economy - Economic Papers 2008 - 2015 312, Directorate General Economic and Financial Affairs (DG ECFIN), European Commission.
    7. S. Bucovetsky, 1997. "Insurance and Incentive Effects of Transfers among Regions: Equity and Efficiency," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 4(4), pages 463-483, November.

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    risk ; states ; government policy;


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