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Sources of Earnings Dispersion in a Linked Employer-Employee Dataset: Evidence from Norway


  • Salvanes, K.G.
  • Burgess, S.
  • Lane, J.


We estimate a standard human capital earnings model, augmented to allow for different firm-specific wage premia. The earnings of an individual depend on her human capital bundle and the earnings mark-up of the firm she is currently working for. We use linked employer-employee data from Norway which allows us to directly estimate the skill premium as a function of firm specific variables such as plant size, the capital/labour ratio, market share, unionisation and openness to trade. We document the impact of job reallocation and skill sorting on earnings dispersion. We find a large potential effect of labour reallocation on earnings dispersion.

Suggested Citation

  • Salvanes, K.G. & Burgess, S. & Lane, J., 1998. "Sources of Earnings Dispersion in a Linked Employer-Employee Dataset: Evidence from Norway," Papers 22/98, Norwegian School of Economics and Business Administration-.
  • Handle: RePEc:fth:norgee:22/98

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Bresnahan, Timothy F. & Trajtenberg, M., 1995. "General purpose technologies 'Engines of growth'?," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 65(1), pages 83-108, January.
    2. Kiminori Matsuyama, 1995. "Complementarities and Cumulative Processes in Models of Monopolistic Competition," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 33(2), pages 701-729, June.
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    6. Nicolas Bloom & Rachel Griffith & John Van Reenen, 1999. "Do R&D tax credits work? Evidence from an international panel of countries 1979-1994," IFS Working Papers W99/08, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    7. Kiminiori Matsuyama, 1995. "Economic Development as Coordination Problems," Discussion Papers 1123, Northwestern University, Center for Mathematical Studies in Economics and Management Science.
    8. Caves, Douglas W & Christensen, Laurits R & Diewert, W Erwin, 1982. "Multilateral Comparisons of Output, Input, and Productivity Using Superlative Index Numbers," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 92(365), pages 73-86, March.
    9. Kamien, Morton I & Muller, Eitan & Zang, Israel, 1992. "Research Joint Ventures and R&D Cartels," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(5), pages 1293-1306, December.
    10. Gronhaug, Kjell & Fredriksen, Tor, 1984. "Governmental innovation support in Norway : Micro- and macro-level effects," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 13(3), pages 165-173, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Philip Du Caju & François Rycx & Ilan Tojerow, 2011. "Wage Structure Effects of International Trade: Evidence from a Small Open Economy," Working Papers CEB 11-011, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    2. Nannan Lundin & Lihong Yun, 2009. "International Trade and Inter-Industry Wage Structure in Swedish Manufacturing: Evidence from Matched Employer-Employee Data," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 17(1), pages 87-102, February.
    3. Meng, Xin, 2004. "Gender earnings gap: the role of firm specific effects," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(5), pages 555-573, October.

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    JEL classification:

    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity


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