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Generational Accounting in Europe

Author

Listed:
  • Raffelhuschen, B.

Abstract

In most member states of the European Union (EU), issues concerning sound and sustainable finances are high on the political agenda. This paper briefly reports the findings of 12 country studies that investigate the impact of the demographic transition on the intergenerational stance of current fiscal policy within EU, using the device of generational accounting as first developed by Alan J Auerbach et al. (1991).

Suggested Citation

  • Raffelhuschen, B., 1999. "Generational Accounting in Europe," Norway; Department of Economics, University of Bergen 196, Department of Economics, University of Bergen.
  • Handle: RePEc:fth:bereco:196
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Gemma Abío & Eduard Berenguer & Holger Bonin & Joan Gil & Concepció Patxot, 2003. "Is the deficit under control? A generational accounting perspective on fiscal policy and labour market trends in Spain," Investigaciones Economicas, Fundación SEPI, vol. 27(2), pages 309-341, May.
    2. Karin Mayr, 2004. "The fiscal impact of immigrants in Austria--a generational accounting analysis," Economics working papers 2004-09, Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
    3. Álvaro Forteza, 2007. "Efectos Distributivos de la Reforma de la Seguridad Social. El Caso Uruguayo," Latin American Journal of Economics-formerly Cuadernos de Economía, Instituto de Economía. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile., vol. 44(129), pages 31-58.
    4. Hayat Khan, 2010. "Private Intergenerational Transfers And Their Ability To Offset The Fiscal Burden Of Ageing," Pacific Economic Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 15(1), pages 116-151, February.
    5. Bernd Raffelhuschen, 1999. "Generational Accounting in Europe," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(2), pages 167-170, May.
    6. Jagadeesh Gokhale & Bernd Raffelhüschen, 1999. "Population aging and fiscal policy in Europe and the United States," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, issue Q IV, pages 10-20.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    ACCOUNTING ; EUROPE;

    JEL classification:

    • O52 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Europe

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