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The Diffusion of Accreditation Among Florida Police Agencies

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  • William G. Doerner

    (Florida State University, College of Criminology & Criminal Justice)

  • William M. Doerner

    (Florida State University, Department of Economics)

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to examine how the adoption of state accreditation has diffused or spread among Florida municipal police law enforcement agencies. The study group consists of all municipal police departments operating continuously in the State of Florida from 1997 through 2006. Independent variables are taken from an annual survey, sponsored by the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, to compare agencies that became accredited (n = 81) with agencies that did not gain state accreditation (n = 189). While accredited agencies differ from non-accredited agencies on a host of indicators at the zero-order, it does not appear that the state accreditation process itself is responsible for nurturing organizational change. Having received national accreditation is an important predictor of gaining state accreditation.

Suggested Citation

  • William G. Doerner & William M. Doerner, 2008. "The Diffusion of Accreditation Among Florida Police Agencies," Working Papers wp2008_10_01, Department of Economics, Florida State University, revised Apr 2009.
  • Handle: RePEc:fsu:wpaper:wp2008_10_01
    DOI: 10.1108/13639510911000812
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. McCabe, Kimberly A. & Fajardo, Robin G., 2001. "Law enforcement accreditation: A national comparison of accredited vs. nonaccredited agencies," Journal of Criminal Justice, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 127-131.
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    Cited by:

    1. Doerner, William M. & Doerner, William G., 2011. "Collective Bargaining and Job Benefits in Florida Municipal Police Agencies, 2000-2009," MPRA Paper 86548, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Oct 2012.
    2. William M. Doerner & William G. Doerner, 2010. "Police Accreditation and Clearance Rates," Working Papers wp2010_06_01, Department of Economics, Florida State University, revised Aug 2010.
    3. Richard Johnson, 2015. "Examining the Effects of Agency Accreditation on Police Officer Behavior," Public Organization Review, Springer, vol. 15(1), pages 139-155, March.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    accreditation; diffusion; adoption of innovation;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • H40 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - General
    • H76 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - Other Expenditure Categories
    • K0 - Law and Economics - - General
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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