IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/fpr/fcndbr/88.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The determinants of employment status in Egypt

Author

Listed:
  • Assaad, Ragu
  • El-Hamidi, Fatma
  • Ahmed, Akhter U.

Abstract

Egyptian labor market is moving from a period of high overall unemployment to one where unemployment is increasingly concentrated among specific groups whose access to the private-sector labor market is limited. Educated young women are more adversely affected than their male counterparts by the transition to a private-sector-led economy. There is no systematic link between youth unemployment among new entrants and poverty unless it is the head of the household who is unemployed. An economic policy environment that is favorable for labor-intensive, export-oriented industries would help absorb the new entrants into the labor market, and the prospect is particularly good for young female workers. Policymakers should consider a reduction in the female-specific employer mandates (such as the existing provision for a generous maternity leave) that raise the cost of hiring women.

Suggested Citation

  • Assaad, Ragu & El-Hamidi, Fatma & Ahmed, Akhter U., 2000. "The determinants of employment status in Egypt," FCND briefs 88, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:fcndbr:88
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.ifpri.org/sites/default/files/publications/fcnbr88.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Haddad, Lawrence James & Ahmed, Akhter U., 2002. "Avoiding chronic and transitory poverty," FCND discussion papers 133, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    2. Lapenu, C├ęcile, 2000. "The role of the state in promoting microfinance institutions," FCND discussion papers 89, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Kirimi, Lilian & Sindi, Kirimi, 2006. "A Duration Analysis of Poverty Transitions in Rural Kenya," 2006 Annual meeting, July 23-26, Long Beach, CA 21475, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    4. Peeters, Marga, 2011. "Demographic pressure, excess labour supply and public-private sector employment in Egypt - Modelling labour supply to analyse the response of unemployment, public finances and welfare," MPRA Paper 31101, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Marga Peeters, 2011. "Modelling unemployment in the presence of excess labour supply," Journal of Economics and Econometrics, Economics and Econometrics Society, vol. 54(2), pages 58-92.
    6. Imelda Flores Vazquez, 2014. "Equilibrium unemployment in the presence of different skill levels in two different regions: Mexico versus Egypt," Letters in Spatial and Resource Sciences, Springer, vol. 7(3), pages 121-131, October.
    7. Ministry of Planning of the Arab Repubic of Egypt & World Bank, 2004. "A Poverty Reduction Strategy for Egypt," World Bank Other Operational Studies 15713, The World Bank.
    8. Wamuthenya, W.R., 2010. "To what extent can disparities in compositional and structural factors account for the gender gap in unemployment in the urban areas of Kenya?," ISS Working Papers - General Series 19752, International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam (ISS), The Hague.
    9. Haddad, Lawrence & Ahmed, Akhter, 2003. "Chronic and Transitory Poverty: Evidence from Egypt, 1997-99," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 71-85, January.
    10. Hanan Nazier, 2017. "Estimating Labor Demand Elasticities and Elasticities of Substitution in Egyptian Manufacturing Sector: A Firm Level Static Analysis," Working Papers 1158, Economic Research Forum, revised 11 2017.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fpr:fcndbr:88. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/ifprius.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.