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Subsidizing job creation in the Great Recession

Author

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  • Sagiri Kitao
  • Aysegül Sahin
  • Joseph Song

Abstract

We analyze the effects of various labor market policies on job creation, job destruction, and employment. The framework of Mortensen and Pissarides (2003) is used to model the dynamic interaction between firms and workers and to simulate their responses to alternative policies. The equilibrium model is calibrated to capture labor market conditions at the end of 2009, including the unemployment, inflow, and outflow rates by workers of different educational attainment. We consider the equilibrium effects of a hiring subsidy, a payroll tax reduction, and an employment subsidy. While calibrating parameters that characterize these policies, we try to mimic the policies in the Hiring Incentives to Restore Employment (HIRE) Act of 2010. We find that a hiring subsidy and a payroll tax deduction, as in the HIRE Act, can stimulate job creation in the short term, but can cause a higher equilibrium unemployment rate in the long term. Employment subsidies succeed in lowering the unemployment rate permanently, but the policy entails high fiscal costs.

Suggested Citation

  • Sagiri Kitao & Aysegül Sahin & Joseph Song, 2010. "Subsidizing job creation in the Great Recession," Staff Reports 451, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fednsr:451
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    Cited by:

    1. Michaillat, Pascal, 2011. "Fiscal Multipliers Over the Business Cycle," CEPR Discussion Papers 8610, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. repec:eee:deveco:v:127:y:2017:i:c:p:25-41 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Epstein, Brendan & Finkelstein Shapiro, Alan, 2017. "Employment and firm heterogeneity, capital allocation, and countercyclical labor market policies," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 127(C), pages 25-41.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Employment ; Unemployment ; Unemployment insurance ; Labor market ; Subsidies ; Equilibrium (Economics);

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