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Is pegging the exchange rate a cure for inflation? East Asian experiences

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  • Reuven Glick
  • Michael Hutchison

Abstract

A common argument for pegging the exchange rate is that it enforces discipline on domestic monetary policy, thus stabilizing inflation expectations. This paper argues that this reasoning does not necessarily apply to East Asia, as the nominal exchange rate pegging policies of these economies are not the explanation for their low inflation. On the contrary, since 1985, those economies whose currencies have appreciated less against the U.S. dollar have tended to experience higher inflation. Factors other than pegging, such as rapid growth, sustainable budget deficits, and relative openness most likely explain the relative success of East Asian economies in achieving low inflation.

Suggested Citation

  • Reuven Glick & Michael Hutchison, 1995. "Is pegging the exchange rate a cure for inflation? East Asian experiences," Pacific Basin Working Paper Series 95-08, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedfpb:95-08
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    1. Reuven Glick & Ramon Moreno, 1995. "Is pegging the exchange rate a cure for inflation? East Asian experiences," FRBSF Economic Letter, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue nov3.
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    Cited by:

    1. Shinji Takagi, 1996. "The Yen and Its East Asian Neighbors, 1980-1995: Cooperation or Competition?," NBER Working Papers 5720, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Reuven Glick & Ramon Moreno, 1995. "Is pegging the exchange rate a cure for inflation? East Asian experiences," FRBSF Economic Letter, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue nov3.
    3. Dene Hurley & Rolando Santos, 2001. "Exchange rate volatility and the role of regional currency linkages: the ASEAN case," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(15), pages 1991-1999.
    4. Ramkishen Rajan, 2010. "The Currency and Financial Crisis in Southeast Asia: A Case of 'Sudden Death' or Death Foretold'?," Working Papers id:2583, eSocialSciences.
    5. Moreno, R. & Pasadilla, G. & Remolona, E., 1998. "Asia's Financial Crisis: Lessons and Policy Responses," Papers 98-02, Economisch Institut voor het Midden en Kleinbedrijf-.
    6. Reza Yamora Siregar, 1999. "Real exchange rate targeting and inflation in Indonesia: theory and empirical evidence," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(4), pages 329-336.
    7. Kawai, Masahiro & Takagi, Shinji, 2000. "Proposed strategy for a regional exchange rate arrangement in post-crisis East Asia," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2503, The World Bank.

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