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What explains differences in foreclosure rates? a response to Piskorski, Seru, and Vig

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  • Manuel Adelino
  • Kristopher S. Gerardi
  • Paul S. Willen

Abstract

In this note we discuss the findings in Piskorski, Seru, and Vig (2010) as well as the authors' interpretation of their results. First, we find that small changes to the set of covariates used by Piskorski, Seru, and Vig significantly reduce the magnitude of the differences in foreclosure rates between securitized and nonsecuritized loans. Second, we argue that early payment defaults (EPD) are not a valid instrument for the securitization status of the loans and that the empirical implementation chosen by the authors for using EPD is not a valid instrumental variables approach. Finally, we discuss the use of foreclosure rates as a measure of renegotiation and argue that explicitly using modification rates of delinquent mortgages is a better way of studying renegotiation activity. On balance, the evidence in Piskorski, Seru, and Vig indicates that there are at most small differences in the outcomes of delinquent loans, but whether those differences reflect accounting issues, willingness to renegotiate, or unobserved heterogeneity remains an open question.

Suggested Citation

  • Manuel Adelino & Kristopher S. Gerardi & Paul S. Willen, 2010. "What explains differences in foreclosure rates? a response to Piskorski, Seru, and Vig," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2010-08, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedawp:2010-08
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    Cited by:

    1. Edward L. Glaeser & Charles G. Nathanson, 2014. "Housing Bubbles," NBER Working Papers 20426, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Ronel Elul, 2010. "What have we learned about mortgage default?," Business Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, issue Q4, pages 12-19.
    3. Been, Vicki & Weselcouch, Mary & Voicu, Ioan & Murff, Scott, 2013. "Determinants of the incidence of U.S. Mortgage Loan Modifications," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(10), pages 3951-3973.
    4. Glaeser, Edward L. & Nathanson, Charles G., 2015. "Housing Bubbles," Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, Elsevier.
    5. Sewin Chan & Claudia Sharygin & Vicki Been & Andrew Haughwout, 2014. "Pathways After Default: What Happens to Distressed Mortgage Borrowers and Their Homes?," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 48(2), pages 342-379, February.

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