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The Lisbon Strategy and the EU's structural productivity problem

Author

Listed:
  • C. Denis
  • K. Mc Morrow
  • W. Röger
  • R. Veugelers

Abstract

The structural nature of the EU's productivity downturn is confirmed by the analysis in this paper, with the bulk of the deterioration emanating from an outdated and inflexible industrial structure which has been slow to adapt to the intensifying pressures of globalisation and rapid technological change. The EU's productivity problems are driven by the combined effect ofan excessive focus on low and medium-technology industries (with declining productivity growth rates and a globalisation-induced contraction in investment levels); an inability to seriously challenge the US's dominance in large areas of the ICT industry, as reflected in the relatively small size of its ICT production sector; and finally, its apparent slowness in reaping the productivity enhancing benefits of ICT in a range of ICT-using industries, although measurement issues severely complicate an assessment of the gains from ICT production and diffusion.

Suggested Citation

  • C. Denis & K. Mc Morrow & W. Röger & R. Veugelers, 2005. "The Lisbon Strategy and the EU's structural productivity problem," European Economy - Economic Papers 2008 - 2015 221, Directorate General Economic and Financial Affairs (DG ECFIN), European Commission.
  • Handle: RePEc:euf:ecopap:0221
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    Cited by:

    1. Elisabetta Croci Angelini & Francesco Farina, 2007. "Technological choices under institutional constraints: measuring the impact on earnings dispersion," Department of Economic Policy, Finance and Development (DEPFID) University of Siena 006, Department of Economic Policy, Finance and Development (DEPFID), University of Siena.
    2. Jacques Pelkmans, 2006. "European Industrial Policy," Bruges European Economic Policy Briefings 15, European Economic Studies Department, College of Europe.
    3. Mongelli, Francesco Paolo & Vega, Juan Luis, 2006. "What effects is EMU having on the euro area and its member countries? An overview," Working Paper Series 599, European Central Bank.
    4. Gaëtan Nicodème & Jacques-Bernard Sauner-Leroy, 2007. "Product Market Reforms and Productivity: A Review of the Theoretical and Empirical Literature on the Transmission Channels," Journal of Industry, Competition and Trade, Springer, vol. 7(1), pages 53-72, March.
    5. Albert van der Horst & Hugo Rojas-Romagosa & Leon Bettendorf, 2009. "Does employment affect productivity?," CPB Discussion Paper 119, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
    6. Domenico Giannone & Lucrezia Reichlin, 2005. "Trends and cycles in the Euro Area: how much heterogeneity and should we worry about it?," Macroeconomics 0511016, EconWPA.
    7. Barrios, Salvador & Burgelman, Jean-Claude, 2007. "Information and Communication Technologies, Market Rigidities and Growth: Implications for EU Policies," MPRA Paper 5838, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Michele Cincera & Reinhilde Veugelers, 2010. "Young Leading Innovators and EU’s R&D intensity gap," JRC Working Papers on Corporate R&D and Innovation 2010-07, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
    9. Kaitila, Ville, 2006. "Productivity, Hours Worked, and Tax/Benefit Systems in Europe and Beyond," Discussion Papers 1015, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy.
    10. Tine Dhont & Freddy Heylen, 2009. "Employment and growth in Europe and the US--the role of fiscal policy composition," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 61(3), pages 538-565, July.
    11. Paul J.J. Welfens, 2005. "Schattenregulierung in der Telekommunikationswirtschaft," EIIW Discussion paper disbei137, Universitätsbibliothek Wuppertal, University Library.
    12. Scheele, Ulrich, 2007. "Privatisierung, Liberalisierung und Deregulierung in netzgebundenen Infrastruktursektoren," Forschungs- und Sitzungsberichte der ARL: Aufsätze,in: Wandel der Stromversorgung und räumliche Politik, pages 35-67 Akademie für Raumforschung und Landesplanung (ARL) - Leibniz-Forum für Raumwissenschaften.
    13. Paul J.J. Welfens, 2006. "Digitale Innovationen, Neue Märkte und Telekomregulierung," EIIW Discussion paper disbei142, Universitätsbibliothek Wuppertal, University Library.
    14. Martin Werding, 2008. "Ageing and Productivity Growth: Are there Macro-level Cohort Effects of Human Capital?," CESifo Working Paper Series 2207, CESifo Group Munich.

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