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Young leading innovators and EUs R&D intensity gap

Author

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  • Reinhilde Veugelers
  • Michele Cincera

Abstract

Innovation in the European Union remains weak and there are relatively few signs of progress. In this policy contribution, Reinhilde Veugelers and Michele Cincera give evidence to show that compared to the US, the EU has fewer young firms among its leading innovators and the primary driver of this private R&D gap is due to the fact that young leading innovators in the EU are less R&D intensive than their...

Suggested Citation

  • Reinhilde Veugelers & Michele Cincera, 2010. "Young leading innovators and EUs R&D intensity gap," Policy Contributions 437, Bruegel.
  • Handle: RePEc:bre:polcon:437
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Bruno Pottelsberghe de la Potterie, 2008. "Europe's R&D: Missing the Wrong Targets?," Intereconomics: Review of European Economic Policy, Springer;ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics;Centre for European Policy Studies (CEPS), vol. 43(4), pages 220-225, July.
    2. repec:dau:papers:123456789/131 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. C. Denis & K. Mc Morrow & W. Röger & R. Veugelers, 2005. "The Lisbon Strategy and the EU's structural productivity problem," European Economy - Economic Papers 2008 - 2015 221, Directorate General Economic and Financial Affairs (DG ECFIN), European Commission.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • O32 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Management of Technological Innovation and R&D

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