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Too much of a good thing? Gender, 'Concerted cultivation' and unequal achievement in primary education

Author

Listed:
  • McCoy, Selina
  • Byrne, Delma
  • Banks, Joanne

Abstract

It is well established that cultural and economic resources imparted to children vary significantly by social class. Literature on concerted cultivation has highlighted the extent to which out-of-school activities can reproduce social inequalities in the classroom. Within this literature however, little attention has been given to the role of gender in concerted cultivation. In this paper, we use data from the first wave of the Growing Up in Ireland longitudinal study to consider how both social class and gender influence the level and type of out-of-school activities in which children engage. Moreover, we examine how out-of-school activities, class and gender impact on children's school engagement and academic achievement. We find that while childrearing logics tend to operate within social class categories, there is an additional cultural aspect of gender in the uptake of different types of out-of-school activities. Our findings suggest the need to move beyond explanations of concerted cultivation to explain gender differences in maths and reading attainment.

Suggested Citation

  • McCoy, Selina & Byrne, Delma & Banks, Joanne, 2010. "Too much of a good thing? Gender, 'Concerted cultivation' and unequal achievement in primary education," Papers WP362, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:esr:wpaper:wp362
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    File URL: http://www.esri.ie/pubs/WP362.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Bryan Coughlan & Edel Doherty & Ciaran O'Neill & Brian E. McGuire, 2014. "Minority Status, Social Welfare Status and their Association with Child Participation in Sporting, Cultural and Community Activities," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 45(1), pages 65-85.
    2. repec:eso:journl:v:47:y:2016:i:4:p:543-575 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Smyth, Emer, 2016. "Arts and Cultural Participation among Children and Young People: Insights from the Growing Up in Ireland Study," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number BKMNEXT323.
    4. repec:eso:journl:v:48:y:2017:i:4:p:419-439 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    social class; concerted cultivation; gender; school engagement; academic achievement; maths performance; reading performance;

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