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Natural Resources and State Fragility

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  • Paul Collier and Anthony J. Venables

Abstract

This paper provides an overview of the relationships between natural resources, governance, and economic performance. The relationships run in both directions, with re-sources potentially altering the quality of governance, and governance being particularly important for resource poor countries. Both these relationships have threshold effects; if governance quality is above a certain level, then natural resources can lead to further improvement, while, below the threshold, further deterioration may take place. Theoretical and empirical work is reviewed, the interactions between the relationships discussed, and policy implications outlined.

Suggested Citation

  • Paul Collier and Anthony J. Venables, 2010. "Natural Resources and State Fragility," EUI-RSCAS Working Papers 36, European University Institute (EUI), Robert Schuman Centre of Advanced Studies (RSCAS).
  • Handle: RePEc:erp:euirsc:p0250
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Edward Miguel & Shanker Satyanath & Ernest Sergenti, 2004. "Economic Shocks and Civil Conflict: An Instrumental Variables Approach," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 112(4), pages 725-753, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Anthony Venables, 2010. "Resource rents; when to spend and how to save," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 17(4), pages 340-356, August.
    2. Kasekende, Elizabeth & Abuka, Charles & Sarr, Mare, 2016. "Extractive industries and corruption: Investigating the effectiveness of EITI as a scrutiny mechanism," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 117-128.
    3. Tom Ogwang & Frank Vanclay & Arjan van den Assem, 2019. "Rent-Seeking Practices, Local Resource Curse, and Social Conflict in Uganda’s Emerging Oil Economy," Land, MDPI, vol. 8(4), pages 1-14, March.
    4. Zenthöfer, A.F., 2011. "The Resource Curse - A Natural Experiment," Discussion Paper 2011-028, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    5. Mohd Rizal Mohd Yaakop & El-Nazeer Eltom & Ali Seman & Roslizawati Taib & Hussin Yusri Zawawi & Norman Suratman & Jazimin & Sharifah Aluya Alinda Dewi & Suhaimee Saahar, 2018. "The Character of Resource Wealth on Contesting a Relationship between the Centre and Regions in Sudan," International Journal of Academic Research in Business and Social Sciences, Human Resource Management Academic Research Society, International Journal of Academic Research in Business and Social Sciences, vol. 8(2), pages 222-243, February.
    6. Toon Vandyck & Alban Kitous & Bert Saveyn & Kimon Keramidas & Luis Rey Los Santos & Krzysztof Wojtowicz, 2018. "Economic Exposure to Oil Price Shocks and the Fragility of Oil-Exporting Countries," Energies, MDPI, vol. 11(4), pages 1-19, April.
    7. Mohd Rizal Yaakop & El-Nazeer Eltom & Ali Seman & Roslizawati Taib & Hussin Yusri Zawaw & Norman Suratman Jazimin & Sharifah Aluya Alinda Dewi, 2018. "Political Implications of Natural Resources Conflict in Sudan," International Journal of Academic Research in Business and Social Sciences, Human Resource Management Academic Research Society, International Journal of Academic Research in Business and Social Sciences, vol. 8(2), pages 141-155, February.
    8. Rudel, Thomas K., 2013. "Food Versus Fuel: Extractive Industries, Insecure Land Tenure, and Gaps in World Food Production," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 62-70.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • Q32 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation - - - Exhaustible Resources and Economic Development
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products
    • P28 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - Natural Resources; Environment

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